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Pan bagnat recipe

Pan bagnat recipe


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  • Recipes
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  • Seafood
  • Fish
  • Oily fish

This is the ultimate French fast food - healthy and so appetising. Easy to make and great for lunches and picnics.


Denbighshire, Wales, UK

2 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 12 anchovy fillets
  • 4 bread rolls
  • 1 garlic clove, halved
  • olive oil
  • 1 lemon
  • salt
  • 2 firm tomatoes, sliced
  • 4 radishes, sliced
  • 1 small onion, sliced
  • 2 hard boiled eggs, peeled and sliced
  • 1 green or yellow pepper, sliced into thin strips
  • 16 black olives, pitted and sliced

MethodPrep:20min ›Ready in:20min

  1. Dip the anchovies in fresh water to desalt them.
  2. Cut the bread rolls in half and remove the soft white middle from the centre of each half.
  3. Rub the inside with the garlic clove, then drench with olive oil and sprinkle with salt.
  4. Finally, layer the inside of the bread roll with the sliced tomatoes, pepper, radish, onions, egg, olives and finish with the anchovies.
  5. Drizzle with lemon juice and olive oil.
  6. Top with the top of the bread roll and enjoy!

Tip

You can wrap them in cling film or foil and put in the fridge overnight and they will be ready for your lunch or picnic. They seem to improve if left this way as the bread becomes soaked with the olive oil which is how they should be. If you don't like anchovies you can use tuna instead or simply have a vegetarian version.

See it on my blog

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Pan Bagnat

ACTIVE: 40 min
TOTAL: 2 hrs 40 min (including 2 hrs chilling time)
TO MAKE AHEAD: Refrigerate for up to 1 day.

This Provençal specialty literally means “bathed bread” and gets its name from the juicy dressed vegetables piled liberally into a crusty loaf. It’s perfect for toting along to soccer games and concerts in the park. We suggest bringing plenty of napkins.

1/2 cup thinly sliced red onion
5 tablespoons red-wine vinegar, divided
2 tablespoons boiling water
1 12-inch crusty whole-wheat country loaf (about 1 pound)
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper
¼ teaspoon salt
2 5-ounce cans oil-packed chunk light tuna, drained
1 cup packed baby arugula
1 cup thinly sliced English cucumber
1 cup thinly sliced radishes
1 cup cherry tomatoes, quartered
1/2 cup pitted olives, roughly chopped
4 large hard-boiled eggs, thinly sliced
1/4 cup packed fresh basil

Combine onion, 2 tablespoons vinegar and water in a small bowl. Marinate, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, cut loaf in half horizontally. Pull out the soft inner bread from each half, leaving a 1/2-inch border. (Save the inner bread for another use, such as making breadcrumbs.)

Whisk the remaining 3 tablespoons vinegar, oil, mustard, pepper and salt in a large bowl. Drain the onion (discard the marinade) and add to the dressing along with tuna, arugula, cucumber, radishes, tomatoes and olives. Toss to coat.

Stuff the tuna mixture into the bottom half of the loaf. Top with eggs, basil and the top of the loaf. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap. Place in the refrigerator and weight down with a large cast-iron skillet or large pot for 2 hours or overnight. Cut into 8 slices.

CAL 266 / FAT 12G (SAT 2G) / CHOL 108MG / CARBS 23G / TOTAL SUGARS 5G (ADDED 0G) / PROTEIN 13G / FIBER 3G / SODIUM 600MG / POTASSIUM 158MG.


About Pan Bagnat

Now this is NOT a traditional recipe for a Pan Bagnat

in Nice in the South of France where this recipe originates, they tend to follow the salad Niçoise method and usually always have anchovies and tuna in the sandwich, as well as eggs too.

The literal translation of Pan Bagnat is from the Provençal dialect of Niçard, and means “wet bread”.

It is often misspelled “pain bagnat” which, while correct in French, is not the spelling used in Niçard.

My Recipe for Pan Bagnat

Although I love the original recipe, I also like a few more veggies in mine, as well as a little ham too, so, this is my take on the classic Pan Bagnat with step-by-step photos of how I assembled it.

This wonderfully sumptuous French Picnic Sandwich can be made WELL in advance, in fact the night before is best.

Slice the sandwich before you go on your picnic if you wish, it is easier, or just take a wooden board and knife for slicing on location. You can also cut this into wedges too.

This makes a stunning centre piece summer luncheon dish, all you need is sunshine and wine, oh yes, and good company!

Variations and Leftovers

There weren’t many of us today, but that means more leftovers, and all you have to do is wrap this back up again and pop it into the fridge, it will last another day and although the bread will be “wetter”, it will still be amazingly tasty.

And what if there aren’t enough of you to warrant making a big brute of a sarnie like this? Well, I have made this recipe in INDIVIDUAL Ciabatta rolls, and they were just as delicious as their bigger cousin, and VERY portable for the school or work packed lunch.

Oh yes, vegetarians need not be scared of this bold sandwich, as you can make this “sans ham” for a veggie feast!

This recipe is part of my Meal Plan that I posted on Monday……and as it has a liberal dose of Fresh Basil in it, I am also entering it into my Herbs on Saturday challenge, which is being guest hosted by Vanesther over at Bangers and Mash this month.

If you’d like to see the round-up of last month’s Herbs on Saturday recipes, and there were some WONDERFUL ones, the round-up is posted here: Herbs on Saturday June Round-Up.

That’s it for today, I have CHOCOLATE and CHICKEN as well as CAKES on the blog tomorrow….it’s a BUSY day! Karen.


Pan Bagnat

Place the eggs in a pot, cover with water and bring just to a boil. Remove from heat. Cover pot and let eggs stand for 10 minutes. In a medium bowl of ice water, shock the eggs drain. Crack the shells, let eggs stand for 5 minutes, then peel and slice.

Meanwhile, in a mixing bowl, combine the shallot, garlic, vinegar and lemon juice season with salt and let stand for 10 minutes. Whisk in the mustard, anchovy paste, if using, and herbes de provence stream in the EVOO while whisking and season with pepper. Add the tuna to the dressing along with the onion, celery, olives and capers mix well.

Halve the baguettes lengthwise and crosswise and fill each sandwich with lettuce and tuna salad. Top with the radishes, cornichons, tomato and sliced eggs. Wrap and chill until ready to serve. Pair with a dry rose.


Ingredients

To Make The Anchovy Dressing: Whisk together the anchovy, garlic, vinegar, salt and pepper in a small bowl. While whisking constantly, slowly drizzle in oil. Add a pinch of salt and pepper, taste, and adjust as desired. If using a French roll, pull out some soft interior crumb to form a cavity.

To Assemble The Sandwich: Spread half of the artichokes and tuna on the bottom. Top with tomato and olives, then radishes, basil, and egg slices. Top with vinaigrette. Cover with second bread half and firmly press sandwich together. Wrap sandwich tightly in foil.

Put sandwich under a weight such as a cast iron pan topped with a filled kettle. Weight sandwich for 7 to 10 to 15 minutes, then flip and weight it for another 10 to 15 minutes. Unwrap, slice and serve immediately, or keep it wrapped for up to 12 hours before serving.

Footnotes

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More France On Salt & Wind Travel

Aida Mollenkamp

Aida is a food and travel expert, author, chef, Food Network personality, founder of the travel services company, Salt & Wind Travel, and partner at the creative agency and educational platform, Border Free Media. She has made her career in food travel media and hospitality and has crisscrossed the globe to search out the best food destinations.

After graduating from the Cornell Hotel School and Le Cordon Bleu Paris, she joined CHOW Magazine where she ran the test kitchen and worked as Food Editor. Aida then moved to television, hosting the Food Network show, Ask Aida, FoodCrafters on the Cooking Channel, In The Pantry on Yahoo!, and the TasteMade series, Off Menu. Her cookbook, Keys To The Kitchen, is a go-to for home cooks who want to become more adventurous cooks and the Travel Guides For Food Lovers series she has co-authored are beloved among food travelers.

Through Border Free Media, Aida shares the lessons she’s learned as an entrepreneur with other creative businesses. From teaching our Cooking Club classes to cohosting our group trips, in all that she does Aida aims to help discerning travelers taste the world.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 10 ounce loaf whole grain baguette-style French bread, split lengthwise, slightly hollowed out if desired, and toasted
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 4.5 ounce pkg.s herb and garlic or lemon pepper marinated chunk light tuna
  • 1 small green sweet pepper, cut in thin bite-sized strips
  • 1 medium tomato, thinly sliced
  • 2 hard cooked eggs,sliced
  • ¼ cup thinly sliced red onion

Drizzle cut sides of baguette with olive oil. Top bottom half of baguette with tuna sweet pepper, tomato, eggs, and onion. Add top half of baguette. Cut crosswise into four servings.


  • ½ cup thinly sliced red onion
  • 5 tablespoons red-wine vinegar, divided
  • 2 tablespoons boiling water
  • 1 12-inch crusty whole-wheat country loaf (about 1 pound)
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
  • ½ teaspoon ground pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 2 (5 ounce) cans oil-packed chunk light tuna, drained
  • 1 cup packed baby arugula
  • 1 cup thinly sliced English cucumber
  • 1 cup thinly sliced radishes
  • 1 cup cherry tomatoes, quartered
  • ½ cup pitted olives, roughly chopped
  • 4 large hard-boiled eggs, thinly sliced
  • ¼ cup packed fresh basil

Combine onion, 2 tablespoons vinegar and water in a small bowl. Marinate, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, cut loaf in half horizontally. Pull out the soft inner bread from each half, leaving a 1/2-inch border. (Save the inner bread for another use, such as making breadcrumbs.)

Whisk the remaining 3 tablespoons vinegar, oil, mustard, pepper and salt in a large bowl. Drain the onion (discard the marinade) and add to the dressing along with tuna, arugula, cucumber, radishes, tomatoes and olives. Toss to coat.

Stuff the tuna mixture into the bottom half of the loaf. Top with eggs, basil and the top of the loaf. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap. Place in the refrigerator and weight down with a large cast-iron skillet or large pot for 2 hours or overnight. Cut into 8 slices.


*SHOPPING TIP

For this sandwich or any recipe where tuna isn't doused in mayo or baked with noodles, it's worth splurging on a high-quality, imported brand. (One we love: Conservas Ortiz, a Spanish tuna available at specialty stores such as Whole Foods or online.) This kind of tuna is line-caught, delicately poached and hand-packed in olive oil so it stays firm and flakes beautifully. The oil keeps the fish moist and silky and adds a rich, almost buttery flavor. You could even use the olive oil from the can to bathe your bread in Step 1 of the recipe---it's that good.


The “bathed bread” sandwich is a picnic powerhouse

The sun is shining, the flowers are blooming, and it’s about time to get the hell out of the house and eat some sandwiches. Picnic season has finally arrived after a dreary, cold winter spent indoors, and though dining out in restaurants remains iffy, no one can stop you from loading up a basket full of tasty delights and heading outside. To make up for lost time, this year’s picnics need to be doubly delightful, so skip the ham and cheese and treat yourself to this tres Francais bathed bread sandwich instead.

This recipe comes to us from Parisian cooking teacher Susan Herrmann Loomis’ latest cookbook, Plat du Jour, and will help create the illusion you’re on vacation in Paris instead of sitting on an old blanket at a local park. We may not have the ability to travel just yet, but hey, at least we’ve got sandwiches.

“Bathed” Bread (Vegetable Sandwich from Nice)

Anyone who has ever been to Nice has most likely had the iconic pan bagnat, this gorgeous, sunny sandwich whose beginnings are very humble. Pan bagnat means, in Provençal dialect, “bathed bread,” referring to the traditional Niçois cooks’ habit of sprinkling stale bread with water to refresh it, then adding it to a bowlful of tomatoes seasoned with salt. The salt encourages the tomatoes to give off their juice, while the bread happily soaks it all up. As time passed, the pan bagnat became more elaborate, as an increasing variety of vegetables were added it became less humble and more structured, too, until it turned into the lovely plat du jour it is today. How does a sandwich rank as a plat du jour? Simple. You make and place this in the center of the plate, pour a glass of rosé, pull out your chair, and sit down to one of the best and most full meals of your life!

  • 6 large best-quality hamburger buns
  • About ¾ cup (185 ml) olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons best-quality red wine vinegar
  • 3 garlic cloves, sliced very thin
  • 6 medium tomatoes (about 4 ounces 120 g each), sliced into ½-inch (1.3 cm) slices
  • 2 red bell peppers, seeded, pith removed, sliced very thin (for 12 slices)
  • 12 radishes, trimmed, rinsed, and thinly sliced lengthwise
  • Fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 6 small new onions (about .5 ounce 15 g), trimmed and diced
  • ⅔ cup (about 72) fava beans (frozen and thawed, or fresh in season)
  • 6 small artichoke hearts (about 3.5 ounces 105 g), fresh or canned
  • 12 anchovy fillets, or one 12-ounce (360 g) can oil-packed tuna
  • 6 large eggs, hard-cooked
  • 12 black olives, pitted
  • 12 large fresh basil leaves
  • Fresh basil sprigs for garnish

Cut the buns in half horizontally. Pull out most of the crumb from the center of each half, leaving the crumb around the edges. This way, you make room for the ingredients.


Easy and Perfect Pan Bagnat Recipe

This delish Pan Bagnat recipe makes enough for 4 very hungry people! A speciality of Nice, the term means “bathed/wet bread”. Sometimes you’ll see it wrongly spelled “pain bagnat”, with the French word for bread, pain, rather than the local pan. This is a popular lunchtime dish and you’ll find it sold in boulangeries and at markets in Nice, alongside another local favourite, Socca. Though not a strictly authentic recipe, this is our Queen of French Cuisine’s take on this lovely recipe.

Ingredients

1 large Boule – a round loaf of bread, as seen in photos
3 tablespoons Olive Oil
6 Roasted Red Peppers from a jar
1/2 Red Onion, peeled and sliced thinly
Fresh basil leaves
Green Olives, about 2 dozen
2 x (125g) balls of Mozzarella Cheese, sliced
3 fresh tomatoes, thinly sliced
2 slices of cooked Ham, (I prefer air dried ham, but it makes the loaf difficult to cut)
Salt and pepper

1. Cut the top off the bread, ( about 2″ deep) and scoop out the inside leaving a 1/2″ shell. Crumble the scooped out bread between your fingers or in a food processor and freeze as breadcrumbs for cooking later.

2. Brush the inside of the bread shell and underneath the lid with the olive oil.

3. Then the fun begins! Layer your sandwich – now, this is NOT written in stone, but these are the layers I prefer, for texture and flavour mingling. First, you place three of your roasted red peppers in the bottom of the shell, I had to cut mine into halves to fit them in snugly.

4. Then add the sliced red onions, then some torn basil leaves.

5. Then add the olives – I cut my olives into slices, so they squash down better and don’t fall out when the loaf is cut!

6. Next is the Mozzarella cheese. Push the slices into the corners as far as you can, tearing some if need be, so they all fit snugly into the bread shell. Then add the first layer of fresh sliced tomatoes, season them well with salt and black pepper and scatter a few more basil leaves over then finally add the ham

7. Now we start to duplicate the ingredients again, adding more roasted red peppers, then more mozzarella cheese and then lastly adding some more slices of fresh tomatoes, not forgetting to add seasoning.

8. Finally, wrap the whole picnic loaf in cling film and sit something heavy on top, I used a tin of Confit D’Canard! Leave it like this for at least 2 hours, it is better overnight actually.

9. You can slice the sandwich before you go on your picnic if you wish, it is easier, or just take a wooden board and knife for slicing on location.

Eh voila! A wonderful sumptuous French Picnic Sandwich! It makes a stunning centre piece summer luncheon dish, especially if you wrap it in greaseproof paper and tie it with string for a very culinbary, arty presentation. All you need is sunshine and wine, oh yes -and good company!

See more of Karen’s special occasion recipes in The Good Life France Magazine



Comments:

  1. Macdoughall

    What the right words ... super, great thought

  2. JoJor

    I also noticed this sometimes, but somehow I didn’t attach any importance to it before.

  3. Malakora

    what we would do without your brilliant phrase



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