ug.mpmn-digital.com
New recipes

Farmer's Daughter Cocktail at Five Leaves

Farmer's Daughter Cocktail at Five Leaves


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


A warm, Fall cocktail that drinks like apple pie.

Photo Courtesy of Maryse Chevriere

The Farmer's Daughter, at Five Leaves

Once again, the time has come to embrace those warm cocktails, the ones that feature the fruits and flavors of the fall season. In this category, the Farmer’s Daughter, a cocktail served at hipster bistro Five Leaves in Greenpoint, New York, fits quite perfectly.

The cocktail was introduced to the menu this past spring, but it drinks like it was made for the cooler months. The Farmer’s Daughter ($10) is served hot [insert joke here], and was described by bartender Dan Sabo as being “like drinking apple pie.” You’re thinking, “You’ve got to be kidding. Like drinking apple pie? This guy should be in advertising.”

Thing is, Dan’s right. “Drinking apple pie” is a spot-on description. Housemade vanilla-infused bourbon, muddled apples, fresh-squeezed lime juice, and brown sugar, garnished with a cinnamon stick and slice of apple. The glass is steamed, hot water is added, and then the liquor. Liquid dessert, fresh out of the shaker.


Farmer's Daughters chef brings a taste of Gippsland to the city

Peruvian-born Alejandro Saravia mans the gill at Farmer's Daughters. Photo: Luis Enrique Ascui

As high-profile restaurants close in the city, this owner is out to hail the regions.

​Chef Alejandro Saravia is standing at the grill in his new city restaurant, Farmer's Daughters, cooking three pieces of striploin. Hefty red gum logs and spindly mountain pepper branches are aflame beneath the bars of the cooktop. Campfire aromas waft through the smart dining room, the mid-level of this three-storey Gippsland-themed eatery, with a ground-floor deli and rooftop bar sandwiching the fine dining restaurant with its hero grill.

The restaurant, which opens this Thursday in the upscale 80 Collins Street development, has been nearly four years in planning but Saravia only got access to the kitchen four days ago. The regional menu he's imagined is now hard up against the reality of cooking on new equipment in an open kitchen. "We're finding the sweet spot for the grill and trying different flavours," he says.


Farmer's Daughters chef brings a taste of Gippsland to the city

Peruvian-born Alejandro Saravia mans the gill at Farmer's Daughters. Photo: Luis Enrique Ascui

As high-profile restaurants close in the city, this owner is out to hail the regions.

​Chef Alejandro Saravia is standing at the grill in his new city restaurant, Farmer's Daughters, cooking three pieces of striploin. Hefty red gum logs and spindly mountain pepper branches are aflame beneath the bars of the cooktop. Campfire aromas waft through the smart dining room, the mid-level of this three-storey Gippsland-themed eatery, with a ground-floor deli and rooftop bar sandwiching the fine dining restaurant with its hero grill.

The restaurant, which opens this Thursday in the upscale 80 Collins Street development, has been nearly four years in planning but Saravia only got access to the kitchen four days ago. The regional menu he's imagined is now hard up against the reality of cooking on new equipment in an open kitchen. "We're finding the sweet spot for the grill and trying different flavours," he says.


Farmer's Daughters chef brings a taste of Gippsland to the city

Peruvian-born Alejandro Saravia mans the gill at Farmer's Daughters. Photo: Luis Enrique Ascui

As high-profile restaurants close in the city, this owner is out to hail the regions.

​Chef Alejandro Saravia is standing at the grill in his new city restaurant, Farmer's Daughters, cooking three pieces of striploin. Hefty red gum logs and spindly mountain pepper branches are aflame beneath the bars of the cooktop. Campfire aromas waft through the smart dining room, the mid-level of this three-storey Gippsland-themed eatery, with a ground-floor deli and rooftop bar sandwiching the fine dining restaurant with its hero grill.

The restaurant, which opens this Thursday in the upscale 80 Collins Street development, has been nearly four years in planning but Saravia only got access to the kitchen four days ago. The regional menu he's imagined is now hard up against the reality of cooking on new equipment in an open kitchen. "We're finding the sweet spot for the grill and trying different flavours," he says.


Farmer's Daughters chef brings a taste of Gippsland to the city

Peruvian-born Alejandro Saravia mans the gill at Farmer's Daughters. Photo: Luis Enrique Ascui

As high-profile restaurants close in the city, this owner is out to hail the regions.

​Chef Alejandro Saravia is standing at the grill in his new city restaurant, Farmer's Daughters, cooking three pieces of striploin. Hefty red gum logs and spindly mountain pepper branches are aflame beneath the bars of the cooktop. Campfire aromas waft through the smart dining room, the mid-level of this three-storey Gippsland-themed eatery, with a ground-floor deli and rooftop bar sandwiching the fine dining restaurant with its hero grill.

The restaurant, which opens this Thursday in the upscale 80 Collins Street development, has been nearly four years in planning but Saravia only got access to the kitchen four days ago. The regional menu he's imagined is now hard up against the reality of cooking on new equipment in an open kitchen. "We're finding the sweet spot for the grill and trying different flavours," he says.


Farmer's Daughters chef brings a taste of Gippsland to the city

Peruvian-born Alejandro Saravia mans the gill at Farmer's Daughters. Photo: Luis Enrique Ascui

As high-profile restaurants close in the city, this owner is out to hail the regions.

​Chef Alejandro Saravia is standing at the grill in his new city restaurant, Farmer's Daughters, cooking three pieces of striploin. Hefty red gum logs and spindly mountain pepper branches are aflame beneath the bars of the cooktop. Campfire aromas waft through the smart dining room, the mid-level of this three-storey Gippsland-themed eatery, with a ground-floor deli and rooftop bar sandwiching the fine dining restaurant with its hero grill.

The restaurant, which opens this Thursday in the upscale 80 Collins Street development, has been nearly four years in planning but Saravia only got access to the kitchen four days ago. The regional menu he's imagined is now hard up against the reality of cooking on new equipment in an open kitchen. "We're finding the sweet spot for the grill and trying different flavours," he says.


Farmer's Daughters chef brings a taste of Gippsland to the city

Peruvian-born Alejandro Saravia mans the gill at Farmer's Daughters. Photo: Luis Enrique Ascui

As high-profile restaurants close in the city, this owner is out to hail the regions.

​Chef Alejandro Saravia is standing at the grill in his new city restaurant, Farmer's Daughters, cooking three pieces of striploin. Hefty red gum logs and spindly mountain pepper branches are aflame beneath the bars of the cooktop. Campfire aromas waft through the smart dining room, the mid-level of this three-storey Gippsland-themed eatery, with a ground-floor deli and rooftop bar sandwiching the fine dining restaurant with its hero grill.

The restaurant, which opens this Thursday in the upscale 80 Collins Street development, has been nearly four years in planning but Saravia only got access to the kitchen four days ago. The regional menu he's imagined is now hard up against the reality of cooking on new equipment in an open kitchen. "We're finding the sweet spot for the grill and trying different flavours," he says.


Farmer's Daughters chef brings a taste of Gippsland to the city

Peruvian-born Alejandro Saravia mans the gill at Farmer's Daughters. Photo: Luis Enrique Ascui

As high-profile restaurants close in the city, this owner is out to hail the regions.

​Chef Alejandro Saravia is standing at the grill in his new city restaurant, Farmer's Daughters, cooking three pieces of striploin. Hefty red gum logs and spindly mountain pepper branches are aflame beneath the bars of the cooktop. Campfire aromas waft through the smart dining room, the mid-level of this three-storey Gippsland-themed eatery, with a ground-floor deli and rooftop bar sandwiching the fine dining restaurant with its hero grill.

The restaurant, which opens this Thursday in the upscale 80 Collins Street development, has been nearly four years in planning but Saravia only got access to the kitchen four days ago. The regional menu he's imagined is now hard up against the reality of cooking on new equipment in an open kitchen. "We're finding the sweet spot for the grill and trying different flavours," he says.


Farmer's Daughters chef brings a taste of Gippsland to the city

Peruvian-born Alejandro Saravia mans the gill at Farmer's Daughters. Photo: Luis Enrique Ascui

As high-profile restaurants close in the city, this owner is out to hail the regions.

​Chef Alejandro Saravia is standing at the grill in his new city restaurant, Farmer's Daughters, cooking three pieces of striploin. Hefty red gum logs and spindly mountain pepper branches are aflame beneath the bars of the cooktop. Campfire aromas waft through the smart dining room, the mid-level of this three-storey Gippsland-themed eatery, with a ground-floor deli and rooftop bar sandwiching the fine dining restaurant with its hero grill.

The restaurant, which opens this Thursday in the upscale 80 Collins Street development, has been nearly four years in planning but Saravia only got access to the kitchen four days ago. The regional menu he's imagined is now hard up against the reality of cooking on new equipment in an open kitchen. "We're finding the sweet spot for the grill and trying different flavours," he says.


Farmer's Daughters chef brings a taste of Gippsland to the city

Peruvian-born Alejandro Saravia mans the gill at Farmer's Daughters. Photo: Luis Enrique Ascui

As high-profile restaurants close in the city, this owner is out to hail the regions.

​Chef Alejandro Saravia is standing at the grill in his new city restaurant, Farmer's Daughters, cooking three pieces of striploin. Hefty red gum logs and spindly mountain pepper branches are aflame beneath the bars of the cooktop. Campfire aromas waft through the smart dining room, the mid-level of this three-storey Gippsland-themed eatery, with a ground-floor deli and rooftop bar sandwiching the fine dining restaurant with its hero grill.

The restaurant, which opens this Thursday in the upscale 80 Collins Street development, has been nearly four years in planning but Saravia only got access to the kitchen four days ago. The regional menu he's imagined is now hard up against the reality of cooking on new equipment in an open kitchen. "We're finding the sweet spot for the grill and trying different flavours," he says.


Farmer's Daughters chef brings a taste of Gippsland to the city

Peruvian-born Alejandro Saravia mans the gill at Farmer's Daughters. Photo: Luis Enrique Ascui

As high-profile restaurants close in the city, this owner is out to hail the regions.

​Chef Alejandro Saravia is standing at the grill in his new city restaurant, Farmer's Daughters, cooking three pieces of striploin. Hefty red gum logs and spindly mountain pepper branches are aflame beneath the bars of the cooktop. Campfire aromas waft through the smart dining room, the mid-level of this three-storey Gippsland-themed eatery, with a ground-floor deli and rooftop bar sandwiching the fine dining restaurant with its hero grill.

The restaurant, which opens this Thursday in the upscale 80 Collins Street development, has been nearly four years in planning but Saravia only got access to the kitchen four days ago. The regional menu he's imagined is now hard up against the reality of cooking on new equipment in an open kitchen. "We're finding the sweet spot for the grill and trying different flavours," he says.


Watch the video: How to make the Farmers Daughter cocktail


Comments:

  1. Jugor

    This is just a great thought.

  2. Morvyn

    it is not clear

  3. Auhert

    depending on the nature of the work

  4. Jerrel

    Specially registered at the forum to tell you a lot for his help in this matter, how can I thank you?



Write a message