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Martha Stewart’s Valentine’s Day Tips

Martha Stewart’s Valentine’s Day Tips



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When you are Martha Stewart, entertaining comes easily. The ultimate guru in homemaking knows a thing or two about making holidays special, especially ones that involve a lot of TLC. The good news is, Stewart is always eager to share her crafting, baking, and homemaking prowess with the world so we can make holidays extra special for our loved ones as well. We recently chatted with Stewart on how to craft the best holiday and even got the skinny on her own Valentine’s Day plans this year!

Have anything special planned this year?

I’ll be having dinner at The Four Seasons Restaurant, snow permitting.

What is your favorite funny pick-up line?

I was in a restaurant having dinner with a girlfriend and a very good-looking man came over, posing as the waiter with a pile of menus in his hand. He started to tell us the specials, and he was just so funny that I looked him and said “You’re not the waiter, who are you?” And he was just a man at the restaurant trying to pick me up, and it worked!

What is the most romantic thing you’ve ever done/has been done for you?

I was lunching at a very fancy restaurant and a man who was trying to get my attention sent me a bouquet of 400 white roses directly to the restaurant. It was in front of everyone, and so large that two waiters had to carry it in and put it on my table! In that moment, everyone at the restaurant was jealous.

Do you have any special projects to do with the kids?

Filling flattened cupcake liners with candy is a great treat that you don’t have to bake. The liners’ pleats nicely frame scrap-art pictures or paper hearts. You can also use a craft punch or paper flowers to make cute borders. For a craft the whole family can enjoy, stack family photos into the shape of a giant heart for playful wall art.

What are you favorite tips for decorating the home for Valentine’s Day?

Garland strands created with a heart garland template are a great and simple way to decorate. Place a heart-shaped template on a stack of card stocks, staple the center of the hearts and cut out the shapes. Make a vertical cut at the point of each heart, and two horizontal cuts from the center of the heart’s point. Then link two hearts through the cuts you’ve made at the points, glue, and continue until all hearts are linked.

More Tips from Martha Stewart:

  • For Valentine’s Day flowers, you can’t go wrong with peonies. I have a fondness for China, and peonies originated there. I grow tree peonies in all my gardens—they’re such exquisite flowers! When choosing flowers for your arrangement, begin by finding one flower that you know the recipient will like, and then build from that. To keep your Valentine’s arrangement fresh, add a couple drops of bleach to cut down on bacteria build up. And always make sure your water levels are high and your thermostat is on low.
  • My favorite type of food is Japanese, which I’d probably choose for a Valentine’s Day date. EN Brasserie in New York’s West Village is a favorite - I love sitting at the sushi bar and having them cook for me. Also, Sushi Yasuda which is really expensive but delicious food.
  • For Valentine’s Day planning, I always say it’s best to let the man plan because you get to know really fast if you want to go out with them again! If it’s a first date, it’s much better to go out for a fun, delicious meal and get to know the person. You don’t get to talk at the movies! I also suggest letting the man cook for you. Men shouldn’t be afraid to cook for women — men actually cook for me all the time! There's no better way to show your love and affection than by treating your beloved to a special Valentine's breakfast in bed. A go-to is New York-Style Crumb Cake, which is featured in my most recent book, ‘Martha Stewart’s Cakes.’ This recipe hits all the right notes — rich buttermilk cake topped with a thick layer of sugary, buttery cinnamon-spiked crumbs. The cake can be made in advance and stored at room temperature, covered, up to five days so you can pop it in the oven on Valentine’s Day morning and not have to worry about spending too much time in the kitchen. Serve it to your special someone in bed with a warm, homemade cappuccino.

Martha Stewart Just Showed Us a Fail-Proof Way to Decorate Valentine’s Day Cookies

Martha Stewart is a queen of hearts. What do we mean by that? Well, she has amazing recipes for Valentine’s Day. Recipes for beginners and advanced bakers. Sure, we have seen her cooking skills, but her baking is next level. From Red Velvet Sheet Cake to Sugared Flower Donuts, her desserts make for the perfect Valentine’s Day sweet treat. If you are looking for an aesthetically pleasing way to impress a loved one, look no further than Martha Stewart’s Iced Heart Cookies. The decorating is fail-proof and sure to be enjoyed by whoever receives these as a gift.

Stewart took to Instagram to share the beautiful creation writing, “Our Valentine’s Day sugar cookies are super-simple to bake and decorate in a big batch (because we know you&rsquove got a lot of love to give).”

Decorating these really is simple. Just dip the cookies in the icing, let them dry, and flick some luster dust on top.

“Just submerge half of a heart in icing and scrape off the bottom on the bowl’s edge. For gold specks, dot on edible luster dust mixed with a bit of lemon,” Stewart writes. The gold specks make this simple technique look very artistic and complex. Feeling creative? Paint food coloring brush strokes on these little hearts. The decorating options are endless.

Definitely start decorating the cookies at least a day before the holiday. Although they take only 12 minutes to bake, the icing on top needs to harden. This can take anywhere from a few hours to overnight but it is definitely worth the wait. When you bite into that crunchy, sugary top, you’ll see exactly what we mean.


Martha Stewart Shares an Easy Valentine’s Day-Themed Drink Your Kids Will Love

Valentine’s Day is nearly here, and while you might already have the romantic goodies you’ll be enjoying yourself on that night your kids require a whole different kind of attention on the holiday. From making cut-out heart crafts to DIY Valentine’s Day cards there are plenty of different ways that you and your kids can celebrate V-day indoors. And besides cute crafts, there’s another sure-fire way to enjoy the day with style: Valentine’s Day-themed food. Martha Stewart dropped a list of Valentine’s Day foods to make with your kids and they all are so sweet and simple to make &mdash especially these adorable strawberry milk pops. We’re smitten!

“Want to make Valentine’s Day with the kids extra sweet?” Stewart wrote on Instagram. “Kick off the day with frozen strawberry milk pops!”

She continued, “They’re simply store-bought strawberry milk (or leftovers from a homemade strawberry smoothie) poured into heart-shaped ice molds, and frozen until solid. Pop the hearts out of the molds, and plunk them in glasses of milk for a berry sweet start to the day.”

Anything heart-shaped is good in our book for Valentine’s Day and we love that this recipe can be either elevated by making your own homemade smoothie or simply store-bought. It’s an incredibly easy way to still celebrate and is still so on-brand for the day’s festivities.

Among the other recipes the lifestyle maven shared to make with your kids are heart-shaped croutons, Heart-Glazed Cornmeal Cookies, S’mores Bars, and Valentine’s Day hot chocolate.

Our mission at SheKnows is to empower and inspire women, and we only feature products we think you&rsquoll love as much as we do. Please note that if you purchase something by clicking on a link within this story, we may receive a small commission of the sale.


Chef Katie Lee makes an easy vegetable pasta

In addition to shopping for pasta, Lee will also be making a visit to the butcher shop.

"I like on Valentine’s Day to do a filet," Lee told TODAY. "It’s a nice cut that you don’t buy every day and it’s a leaner cut as well."

Bobby Flay's Sweet and Spicy Filet Mignon


Martha Stewart is stopping by the TODAY kitchen to share a few of her favorite Valentine's Day treat recipes that make great homemade gifts. She shows us how to prepare sweet chocolate and peanut butter cups, rich hot chocolate and caramel chocolate truffles.

Martha Stewart's No-Bake Chocolate-Peanut Butter Cups

These homemade cups taste just like the beloved classic confection. Velvety chocolate enrobes creamy peanut butter in a perfectly sized two-bite treat.

Martha Stewart's Favorite Hot Chocolate

Nothing warms you from the inside out quite like a cup of rich, creamy hot cocoa on a chilly day. This perfectly chocolaty recipe is one of my favorites.

Martha Stewart's Chocolate-Caramel Truffles

These truffles are inspired by brigadeiros, a confection popular throughout Brazil. Here, the traditional chocolate sprinkles get swapped for a festive Valentine's color combo.

If you like those Valentine's Day recipes, you should also try these:


Martha Stewart’s Valentine’s Day Cards Have a Sweet Surprise Inside

Finding the perfect gift for your significant other, friend or loved one is never easy &mdash especially on holidays that have hype surrounding gift-giving. We have learned that the best gifts are those that really come from the heart, it doesn’t matter how rare they are or how much they cost. What better way to show your love than on Valentine’s Day with a beautiful homemade card. When someone has put time and effort into creating something just for you it feels extra special. Martha Stewart has saved us yet again by sharing the sweetest Valentine’s Day card tutorial that comes with a sweet surprise inside.

Martha Stewart isn’t offering just regular old cards &mdash hers come with adorable little popups that turn the cards into a 3D gift. Stewart shared her creation on Instagram writing, “Take Valentine’s Day to a new dimension with paper-honeycomb pop-up cards that elicit real awwws. Just fold plain card stock in half, and glue on embellishments like cutout petals and pipe-cleaner stems. Then draw on extra details (like the eyelashes), pen a cheeky note, and adhere a honeycomb ball or fitting shape in the crease to complete your heart-swelling message.”


Martha Stewart Shares a Valentine's Day-Themed Drink Your Kids Will Love

Valentine’s Day is nearly here, and while you might already have the romantic goodies you’ll be enjoying yourself on that night your kids require a whole different kind of attention on the holiday. From making cut-out heart crafts to DIY Valentine’s Day cards there are plenty of different ways that you and your kids can celebrate V-day indoors. And besides cute crafts, there’s another sure-fire way to enjoy the day with style: Valentine’s Day-themed food. Martha Stewart dropped a list of Valentine’s Day foods to make with your kids and they all are so sweet and simple to make — especially these adorable strawberry milk pops. We’re smitten!

“Want to make Valentine’s Day with the kids extra sweet?” Stewart wrote on Instagram. “Kick off the day with frozen strawberry milk pops!”

She continued, “They’re simply store-bought strawberry milk (or leftovers from a homemade strawberry smoothie) poured into heart-shaped ice molds, and frozen until solid. Pop the hearts out of the molds, and plunk them in glasses of milk for a berry sweet start to the day.”

Anything heart-shaped is good in our book for Valentine’s Day and we love that this recipe can be either elevated by making your own homemade smoothie or simply store-bought. It’s an incredibly easy way to still celebrate and is still so on-brand for the day’s festivities.

Among the other recipes the lifestyle maven shared to make with your kids are heart-shaped croutons, Heart-Glazed Cornmeal Cookies, S’mores Bars, and Valentine’s Day hot chocolate.

Get Martha Stewart’s Valentine’s Day recipes for your kids online or in the Jan/Feb issue of Martha Stewart Living.

Our mission at SheKnows is to empower and inspire women, and we only feature products we think you’ll love as much as we do. Please note that if you purchase something by clicking on a link within this story, we may receive a small commission of the sale.


Martha Stewart's Valentine's Day brunch

The lifestyle entrepreneur and cookbook author demonstrates how to make French Toast with Grand Marnier, topped off with a Blood Orange Mimosa, for the perfect holiday brunch.

Video Transcript

- Time for a Valentine's Day brunch-- your host Martha Stewart, author of the new book "Very Good Things.

MARTHA STEWART: Hi, everyone. When we think of Valentine's Day, we think of chocolates and heart-shaped boxes and red roses. And it is one of my favorite holidays. I love to remember loved ones.

Well, today, we're going to take a little bit different approach. I'm going to show you how to make a wonderful breakfast of French toast and a cocktail, a take on the old fashioned mimosa. So get out your pots and pans and just get ready to cook.

Find yourself a nice loaf of brioche bread. You can make it, of course, if you're a good baker, and slice it about 3/4 of an inch thick. The custard into which you dip your French bread, your brioche, is made of six fresh eggs.

Whisk this up with a fork. Good things are a very important part of my life. This French toast is a good thing. And during this entire segment, I'll probably say good thing 44 times. So bear with me.

Add whole milk, granulated sugar, and a pinch of salt. And don't forget, most importantly, some Grand Marnier. I like to add oh, a couple tablespoons. Any orange-flavored liqueur will do.

I thought we would also use blood oranges in our custard. So I take just the exterior of the skin with a great grater. Don't try to grate a squeezed orange. It's much better to zest before you cut and squeeze. Just makes sense. Good things make sense.

And now cut your orange in half. Look at that great color. I'm adding this pink juice to our custard. Take your sliced brioche and let it soak just a short time. You don't want it to fall apart. It can get too wet if you leave it in too long.

So now for the cooking-- 4 tablespoons of safflower oil or another unflavored oil and 2 tablespoons of butter. Melt the butter, get the oil sizzling.

Everyone always asks me, what's my favorite holiday? And I always say, it's the next holiday that's coming. And I feel that way about each and every holiday Valentine's Day is a very special day in our family ever since I was a child making Valentine's card boxes from my classmates.

Ah, gorgeous. Oh, and it puffs up a little bit because it's brioche. [GASPS] There's a perfect one. So two gorgeous slices of French toast, some segmented oranges-- a really nice touch.

And I've made some really cute heart-shaped butters. Put that right the top your French toast. We're not counting calories today. Remember that. And a little sprinkling of the sanding sugar. This piece is for me. Mm!

And don't forget the cocktail. Add about a half a glass of blood orange juice--

--a slice or a wedge of blood orange. These are fantastic oranges. And top it off with your favorite sparkling wine. It fizzes really nicely.

So I hope that you make that French toast. Your family, your friends will love you for it. And this cocktail, superb. Happy Valentine's Day, everybody.

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'You Can Feel the Tension': A Windfall for Minority Farmers Divides Rural America

LaGRANGE, Mo. — Shade Lewis had just come in from feeding his cows one sunny spring afternoon when he opened a letter that could change his life: The government was offering to pay off his $200,000 farm loan, part of a new debt relief program created by Democrats to help farmers who have endured generations of racial discrimination. It was a windfall for a 29-year-old who has spent the past decade scratching out a living as the only Black farmer in his corner of northeastern Missouri, where signposts quoting Genesis line the soybean fields and traffic signals warn drivers to go slow because it is planting season. But the $4 billion fund has angered conservative white farmers who say they are being unfairly excluded because of their race. And it has plunged Lewis and other farmers of color into a new culture war over race, money and power in U.S. farming. Sign up for The Morning newsletter from the New York Times “You can feel the tension,” Lewis said. “We’ve caught a lot of heat from the conservative Caucasian farmers.” The debt relief is redress set aside for what the government calls “socially disadvantaged farmers” — Black, Hispanic, Indigenous and other nonwhite workers who have endured a long history of discrimination, from violence and land theft in the Jim Crow South to banks and federal farm offices that refused them loans or government benefits that went to white farmers. The program is part of a broader effort by the Biden administration and Democrats in Congress to confront how racial injustice has shaped U.S. farming, which is overwhelmingly white. Black farm advocacy groups say that nearly all the land, profit and subsidies go to the biggest, most powerful farm operations, leaving Black farmers with little. But in large portions of rural America, the payments threaten to further anger white conservative farmers. The plans have drawn thousands of enraged comments on farm forums and are being fought by banks worried about losing interest income. And some rural residents have rallied around a new slogan, cribbed from the conservative response to the Black Lives Matter movement: All Farmers Matter. Lewis is part of a new generation of Black farmers venturing back into urban plots and small rural farms, driven by a desire to nourish their communities with healthy food and create wealth rooted in the land. Growing up in LaGrange, a city of 950 along the Mississippi River, Lewis would scoot a toy John Deere tractor through his mother’s apartment and pretend he was farming the carpet. He joined 4-H, farming and business groups in high school. He started farming at 19, with a few cows and dreams of ending the day with his own dirt on the soles of his boots. “I worried about him,” said his father, Kevin Lewis. “I watch him and shake my head and say, 'Is it worth it?'” It can be a tough, lonely life. In 1920, African Americans owned some 14% of the farms in the United States. But after a century of racial violence, foreclosures, migration into cities and farm consolidation, there are fewer than 49,000 left, representing 1.4% of American farmers. Most are concentrated in the Southeast and Texas. These days, Black farmers have forged online networks that function as their own digital homemade farm bureaus. They celebrate first turnip harvests, ask whether fertilizer made from fish can revive wilting plants and commiserate about navigating government programs and the isolation of being the only Black farmers in their counties. “You don’t have a network. You don’t have an infrastructure. There’s nothing,” said Sandy Thompson, who started an online directory of Black farmers in 2019 after abandoning a three-year quest to convert a 5-acre plot outside San Antonio into a vegetable farm. Thompson spent $20,000 on equipment only to have her mower get stuck in the sandy soil. She called university extension offices, a vital source of guidance for farmers, but said she never got any help. “We are not competitive with white farmers,” she said. “We need any help we can get.” Nonwhite farmers, who make up about 5% of farmers, say they struggle disproportionately to get loans and government grants. They received less than 1% of the billions of dollars in subsidies that flowed into farm country last year under former President Donald Trump to compensate farmers hurt by the coronavirus pandemic and the trade war with China. Lewis said he spent years struggling financially and searching for credit as he built his cattle herd from a few cows on rented ground to about 200 cows and calves on more than 100 acres of his own land. At first, he said, farm agents did not return his calls. Banks scoffed at his plans. Some days, he could not afford to gas up the red pickup truck that would stall out as he went to fix fences and spread manure in his alfalfa fields. Like many farmers, he works a second job, on power transmission lines. Getting his government loan paid off now could change everything. He said he could pay down other loans on his livestock, expand the patchwork of fields he owns to compete against established farmers, and get financing to build a home so he and his wife can escape their one-bedroom apartment. “It’ll open up a whole lot of doors,” he said. “Maybe these local banks that didn’t have time for minorities will open up to us.” But several of his white neighbors in Lewis County, where 77% of voters supported Trump in November, see it differently. Now, raw conversations about discrimination in farming are unfolding at farmers markets and on rural social media channels where race is often an uncomfortable subject. “It’s a bunch of crap,” said Jeffrey Lay, who grows corn and soybeans on 2,000 acres and is president of the county farm bureau. “They talk about they want to get rid of discrimination. But they’re not even thinking about the fact that they’re discriminating against us.” Even in a county that is 94% white, Lay said the federal government’s renewed focus on helping farmers of color made him feel like he was losing ground, a sign to him of the country’s demographic shifts. “I can’t afford to go buy that 5,000-acre piece of ground,” he said. “Shade Lewis, he’d qualify to get it. And that’s fine. That doesn’t bother me. But I can’t.” Lewis senses the tensions when he swings into the gas station to get a Mountain Dew before feeding his cows in the morning and when he scans comments on Facebook or the news on RFD-TV, a kind of CNN for rural America. Conversations with white farmers around LaGrange become strained when they veer from corn prices to the challenges of being a Black farmer in a white industry. “You can sit here and talk about race and things you’ve been through,” Lewis said. “They don’t understand. They’ll never understand.” Many farmers of color have welcomed the debt relief, which was tucked into the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief act, as well as even more ambitious measures proposed by Democrats to grant plots of up to 160 acres to Black farmers. The Agriculture Department has a long-standing series of programs to serve socially disadvantaged farmers and estimates that nearly 16,000 will have loans paid off that were made or backed by the government. The agency has sent thousands of letters to eligible farmers and expects that money could start flowing by early June. But rural residents upset with the repayments call them reverse racism. White conservative farmers and ranchers from Florida, Texas and the Midwest quickly sued to block the program, arguing that the promised money amounts to illegal discrimination. America First Legal, a group run by former Trump aide Stephen Miller, is backing the Texas lawsuit, whose plaintiff is the state’s agriculture commissioner. “It’s anti-white,” said Jon Stevens, one of five Midwestern farmers who filed a lawsuit through the Wisconsin Institute for Law and Liberty, a conservative legal group. “Since when does Agriculture get into this kind of race politics?” Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack defended the debt-repayment program at a White House briefing this month, saying that earlier coronavirus relief had gone disproportionately to white farmers. He also said the government had never addressed the cumulative effects of years of racial discrimination against farmers. “We know for a fact that socially disadvantaged producers were discriminated against by the United States Department of Agriculture,” he said. “There is a very legitimate reason for doing what we’re doing.” The use of race in federal programs has been a subject of litigation for decades, with a narrow majority of the Supreme Court deciding in 1995 that it is permissible only if the programs are “narrowly tailored” to accomplish a “compelling governmental interest.” The courts have generally held that institutions have a compelling interest in remedying their own past discrimination. Still, the lawsuits have sowed concern and anger through networks of Black farmers. Some have spent decades fighting unsuccessfully to get their share of legal settlements over past discrimination by the Agriculture Department. Now they are worried that the money set aside for debt repayment could get delayed for years in legal challenges. “We’re getting the short end,” said John Wesley Boyd Jr., a Virginia bean and grain farmer who is also founder of the National Black Farmers Association. “Anytime in the United States if there’s money for Blacks, those groups speak up and say how unfair it is. But it’s not unfair when they’re spitting on you, when they’re calling you racial epithets, when they’re tearing up your application.” Lewis said he tries to look beyond issues of race and has a white wife, white in-laws and white family on his mother’s side. But ignoring race can be impossible in a small town like LaGrange, he said. He hunts, fishes, holds conservative views and curses by saying “son of a buck.” He has voted Republican in past elections, but unlike most of his neighbors, he voted for President Joe Biden. One recent afternoon, a friend, Brad Klauser, who runs his family’s large cattle and grain farm, swung by Lewis’ barn to catch up. As they talked bills, rising fuel costs and sky-high land prices, the conversation turned to the debt relief that only one of them was eligible to receive. “Everybody should have the same option,” said Klauser, who is white, leaning on the flatbed of Lewis’ pickup. “Do you think you’re disadvantaged?” “There’s definitely disadvantages,” Lewis replied, saying that officials scoffed when he first tried to get a federal farm loan. “They didn’t take me serious.” After Klauser headed home, Lewis thought about how the two friends were both trying to reap a profit from the land. “Everyone should have a chance at farming,” he said. This article originally appeared in The New York Times. © 2021 The New York Times Company

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Martha Stewart’s Valentine’s Day Tips - Recipes

I enjoy celebrating all holidays and every Valentine's Day, I try to make something special and meaningful to give to my nearest and dearest.

This year, I gave each of my male friends and colleagues a special limited edition heart-shaped gift box of my Martha Stewart CBD gummies. And, for my grandchildren and some other close friends, I baked and decorated dozens of heart-shaped cookies in different sizes and shades of pink and white - my granddaughter, Jude, helped me and everyone loved them. If you didn't already see this year's cookies, be sure to watch my videos on my Instagram page @MarthaStewart48.

This year, Canopy Growth and I offered this Martha Stewart CBD Limited Edition six-flavor sampler gift box for Valentine’s Day. They sold out very quickly.
Valentine’s Day is over, but you can still purchase a 60-piece gummy sampler containing wellness gummies in 15 different flavors inspired by the ingredients I love and use in baking and cooking. Check it out on MarthaStewartCBD.com.
For my cookies, I used my Sugar Cookies recipe from “Martha Stewart’s Christmas: Entertaining, Decorating, and Giving” – I am sure many of you have a copy, but if not, you can still find it. It has so many wonderful recipes and tips.
The first step is to gather all the ingredients – here are all the decorating ingredients and my giant heart-shaped cookie cutters. I have had these cutters for years.
I use Domino whenever recipes call for sugar. I use it in my own baking and whenever we bake on television or social media. Domino is used on the east coast, while their C&H brand sugar is used on the west coast.
We sifted all the dry ingredients – the flour and the confectioner’s sugar. Sifted flour, which is much lighter than unsifted flour, is easier to mix into other ingredients when making dough.
Then I creamed the butter and sugar. Technically, creaming means mixing butter and sugar together on a moderately high speed until well blended, fluffy and pale yellow.
I also use Vermont Creamery Cultured Butter. It is a cultured butter – the cream has been aged with cultures for about a day. Cultured butter has a distinct, tangy flavor with all of the creaminess of rich European butter. Vermont Creamery lets their high-fat cream age for 20 hours. The longer the cream ages, the more pronounced the tangy flavor will be.
The dry ingredients were added to the mixture until well-blended. Then, I added a large egg, a half-teaspoon of vanilla extract, and two tablespoons of cognac. One can also use brandy.
Once it was ready, I put it on a piece of plastic wrap and rolled out the dough in two batches, so it’s easier to manage.
After rolling, they were completely wrapped and chilled for at least 30-minutes – mine were chilled overnight. Chilled dough will help retain the shape of the cookies soft, warm dough tends to lose its shape when cut and moved.
The next morning, the doughs are perfect. They get really hard, but they roll out so beautifully.
Here they are about to go into the oven. It’s such a treat for me to bake, it’s become an annual tradition. These cookies are baked at 400-degrees Fahrenheit for 10-minutes.
Here are some batches already cooling – all perfectly browned. The cookies are about 1/8-inch thick.
I made large and small cookies – some with decorative edges and some left smooth.
My process for decorating sugar cookies involves the four “Ds” – dipping, dripping, decorating, and drying. Sugar cookies are delicious anytime on their own, but they also make ideal holiday cookies when decorated with royal icing. I used royal icing made from confectioner’s sugar, meringue from my own egg whites, food coloring, water, and then hand-dipped each cookie very carefully. I do this instead of damming and flooding, which is a much more precise method.
I dipped just the top of the cookie, so each one looks smooth and perfect. The frosting has to be exactly the right consistency to dip the cookies satisfactorily. And remove them very carefully, letting the excess drip. Once they are flat, the icing will level out into a perfect surface for decorating.
While the white frosting is still wet, I use pink icing on top. I make horizontal lines first across the cookie.
Then, using the tip of a bamboo skewer, I just pull the frosting down from the top to the bottom of the cookie making this Napoleonic design. It is called this because the same design is seen on Napoleon pastries.
Jude and I decorated so many cookies. Jude is extremely artistic and creative. Here she is making a concentric circle pattern on a cookie before she uses her skewer to make the Napoleonic decoration.
Jude also decorated the smaller cookies – try to save take-out squeeze bottles when you can – they are perfect for icing and decorating.
And here are some of the finished cookies drying on the rack. They need to dry completely before the last “D” – devouring.

Here's a short video of the cookies we made - I hope you all had a very lovely Valentine's Day!


Martha Stewart’s Valentine’s Day Tips - Recipes

I enjoy celebrating all holidays and every Valentine's Day, I try to make something special and meaningful to give to my nearest and dearest.

This year, I gave each of my male friends and colleagues a special limited edition heart-shaped gift box of my Martha Stewart CBD gummies. And, for my grandchildren and some other close friends, I baked and decorated dozens of heart-shaped cookies in different sizes and shades of pink and white - my granddaughter, Jude, helped me and everyone loved them. If you didn't already see this year's cookies, be sure to watch my videos on my Instagram page @MarthaStewart48.

This year, Canopy Growth and I offered this Martha Stewart CBD Limited Edition six-flavor sampler gift box for Valentine’s Day. They sold out very quickly.
Valentine’s Day is over, but you can still purchase a 60-piece gummy sampler containing wellness gummies in 15 different flavors inspired by the ingredients I love and use in baking and cooking. Check it out on MarthaStewartCBD.com.
For my cookies, I used my Sugar Cookies recipe from “Martha Stewart’s Christmas: Entertaining, Decorating, and Giving” – I am sure many of you have a copy, but if not, you can still find it. It has so many wonderful recipes and tips.
The first step is to gather all the ingredients – here are all the decorating ingredients and my giant heart-shaped cookie cutters. I have had these cutters for years.
I use Domino whenever recipes call for sugar. I use it in my own baking and whenever we bake on television or social media. Domino is used on the east coast, while their C&H brand sugar is used on the west coast.
We sifted all the dry ingredients – the flour and the confectioner’s sugar. Sifted flour, which is much lighter than unsifted flour, is easier to mix into other ingredients when making dough.
Then I creamed the butter and sugar. Technically, creaming means mixing butter and sugar together on a moderately high speed until well blended, fluffy and pale yellow.
I also use Vermont Creamery Cultured Butter. It is a cultured butter – the cream has been aged with cultures for about a day. Cultured butter has a distinct, tangy flavor with all of the creaminess of rich European butter. Vermont Creamery lets their high-fat cream age for 20 hours. The longer the cream ages, the more pronounced the tangy flavor will be.
The dry ingredients were added to the mixture until well-blended. Then, I added a large egg, a half-teaspoon of vanilla extract, and two tablespoons of cognac. One can also use brandy.
Once it was ready, I put it on a piece of plastic wrap and rolled out the dough in two batches, so it’s easier to manage.
After rolling, they were completely wrapped and chilled for at least 30-minutes – mine were chilled overnight. Chilled dough will help retain the shape of the cookies soft, warm dough tends to lose its shape when cut and moved.
The next morning, the doughs are perfect. They get really hard, but they roll out so beautifully.
Here they are about to go into the oven. It’s such a treat for me to bake, it’s become an annual tradition. These cookies are baked at 400-degrees Fahrenheit for 10-minutes.
Here are some batches already cooling – all perfectly browned. The cookies are about 1/8-inch thick.
I made large and small cookies – some with decorative edges and some left smooth.
My process for decorating sugar cookies involves the four “Ds” – dipping, dripping, decorating, and drying. Sugar cookies are delicious anytime on their own, but they also make ideal holiday cookies when decorated with royal icing. I used royal icing made from confectioner’s sugar, meringue from my own egg whites, food coloring, water, and then hand-dipped each cookie very carefully. I do this instead of damming and flooding, which is a much more precise method.
I dipped just the top of the cookie, so each one looks smooth and perfect. The frosting has to be exactly the right consistency to dip the cookies satisfactorily. And remove them very carefully, letting the excess drip. Once they are flat, the icing will level out into a perfect surface for decorating.
While the white frosting is still wet, I use pink icing on top. I make horizontal lines first across the cookie.
Then, using the tip of a bamboo skewer, I just pull the frosting down from the top to the bottom of the cookie making this Napoleonic design. It is called this because the same design is seen on Napoleon pastries.
Jude and I decorated so many cookies. Jude is extremely artistic and creative. Here she is making a concentric circle pattern on a cookie before she uses her skewer to make the Napoleonic decoration.
Jude also decorated the smaller cookies – try to save take-out squeeze bottles when you can – they are perfect for icing and decorating.
And here are some of the finished cookies drying on the rack. They need to dry completely before the last “D” – devouring.

Here's a short video of the cookies we made - I hope you all had a very lovely Valentine's Day!


Watch the video: Martha Stewarts Favorite Valentines Day Moments - Martha Stewart