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America’s Best Chinese Takeout

America’s Best Chinese Takeout


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Sesame chicken is just the tip of the iceberg

Chewy, springy, hand-pulled noodles are the name of the game at New York's Xi'An Famous Foods.

From a ‘pie house’ specializing in Frisbee-sized xian bing meat pies in California to a Peking duck stall in Flushing, Queens, the U.S. is chock full of life-changing Chinese restaurants, and the vast majority of them will let you take your food to go. So cancel your dinner plans, because we’re rounding up the 15 best Chinese take-out spots in America.

America’s Best Chinese Takeout (Slideshow)

Travel to just about any city in America and odds are there’ll be a Chinese restaurant nearby. Convenient, inexpensive, and full of flavor, Chinese food is one of the country’s great adopted cuisines. But for many, trying to replicate the flavors of Chinese cuisine in your own kitchen can present a challenge — even to the more skilled gastronomes among us. Even if you know how to wok-fry and double-steam with the best of them, ordering Chinese remains one of the most popular takeout and delivery options around, right up there with pizza (but with far more variety).

From Sichuan and Canton to Shandong and Beijing, we’re a fortunate nation to have so many provincial Chinese cuisines represented not just in the larger metropolises but throughout the lower 48 and beyond. Whether you’re sampling San Tung’s addictive chicken wings on the run in San Francisco or tucking into some insanely delicious hand-pulled noodles from New York’s Xi’An Famous Foods, the restaurants on our list are certainly worth writing home about.

The Daily Meal searched America to seek out the best Chinese takeout, from strip mall nooks and holes-in-the-wall to bustling Chinatown institutions and bold new kids on the block. We consulted our own group of chefs and city experts, James Beard Award-winning and nominated chefs like Ken Oringer and Anita Lo and both nationally and locally trusted sources online and in print in cities across the country. Some great places didn't make the list, but after qualifying the food based on authenticity to regional cuisine, speed and of course, flavor, the food from these 15 places emerged as the clear winners.

For those with a coastal bias — don’t despair. There’s many a specialized delicacy to be found all over the country. So brush up on your chopsticks skills, it's time to get down to business. Click here to learn which 15 Chinese takeout spots are America’s best.

Dan Myers is the Eat/Dine Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @sirmyers. Additional reporting by Zak Feldman.


The Best Chinese Takeout in America

From a "pie house" specializing in Frisbee-sized xian bing meat pies in California to a Peking duck stall in Flushing, Queens, the U.S. is chock full of life-changing Chinese restaurants, and the vast majority of them will let you take your food to go. So cancel your dinner plans, because we're rounding up the 15 best Chinese take-out spots in America.

Travel to just about any city in America and odds are there'll be a Chinese restaurant nearby. Convenient, inexpensive and full of flavor, Chinese food is one of the country's great adopted cuisines. But for many, trying to replicate the flavors of Chinese cuisine in your own kitchen can present a challenge -- even to the more skilled gastronomes among us. Even if you know how to wok-fry and double-steam with the best of them, ordering Chinese remains one of the most popular takeout and delivery options around, right up there with pizza (but with far more variety).

From Sichuan and Canton to Shandong and Beijing, we're a fortunate nation to have so many provincial Chinese cuisines represented not just in the larger metropolises but throughout the lower 48 and beyond. Whether you're sampling San Tung's addictive chicken wings on the run in San Francisco or tucking into some insanely delicious hand-pulled noodles from New York's Xi'An Famous Foods, the restaurants on our list are certainly worth writing home about.

The Daily Meal searched America to seek out the best Chinese takeout, from strip mall nooks and holes-in-the-wall to bustling Chinatown institutions and bold new kids on the block. We consulted our own group of chefs and city experts, James Beard Award-winning and nominated chefs like Ken Oringer and Anita Lo and both nationally and locally trusted sources online and in print in cities across the country. Some great places didn't make the list, but after qualifying the food based on authenticity to regional cuisine, speed and of course, flavor, the food from these 15 places emerged as the clear winners.

For those with a coastal bias -- don't despair. There's many a specialized delicacy to be found all over the country. So brush up on your chopsticks skills, it's time to get down to business.


These are the most popular takeout foods around the country

We used to only have pizza and Chinese food available for takeout, but why cook when you can have your favorite food delivered to your door with just the click of a button? America may be obsessed with on-demand food delivery, but that's just about the only part of our meal we can agree on.

UberEATS — the food delivery arm of the ride-sharing service — just served up a list of the most popular takeout dishes in 30 major cities across the country, according to their users. There were some predictable winners like Philadelphia loves their cheesesteaks and Dallas is obsessed with tacos, but we saw some surprises too like Minneapolis and their Kingston:style jerk chicken, and San Francisco's love for Chinese fish bowls.

The full list is below.

Atlanta, Georgia: wings

Austin, Texas: poke bowl

Baltimore, Maryland: build-your-own burger

Boston, Massachusetts: two-protein rice bowl

Charlotte, North Carolina: burrito bowl

Chicago, Illinois: build your own salad bowl

Cincinnati, Ohio: burrito

Cleveland, Ohio: burrito

Dallas, Texas: tacos

Denver, Colorado: build your own salad bowl

Houston, Texas: burger

Indianapolis, Indiana: build-your-own burger

Las Vegas, Nevada: ahi tuna

Los Angeles, California: build-your-own protein bowl

Miami, Florida: poke bowl

Minneapolis, Minnesota: Kingston-style jerk chicken

Nashville, Tennessee: burgers from Tavern (a gastropub in midtown)

New Orleans, Louisiana: super burrito

New York, New York: poke bowl

Orlando, Florida: wings from Wings 'n Things

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: cheesesteaks

Phoenix, Arizona: street tacos

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania: the Hangar 1 order from Wings Over Pittsburgh

Portland, Oregon: burritos

San Antonio, Texas: build-your-own burger

San Diego, California: build-your-own salad bowl

San Francisco, California: Chinese fish bowls

Seattle, Washington: build-your-own salad bowl

Tampa Bay, Florida: the "six bowl" (healthy protein bowl) from Eat Fresh Kitchen

Washington, DC: bibimbap

We're automatically suspicious of any top takeout foods list that does not include pizza. However, as UberEATS told us, "Uber has Italian restaurants on the list, but perhaps not everyone loves pizza as much as New Yorkers do!"


2. Koi Palace, Daly City, Calif.

The secret to this perpetually-crowded Hong Kong-style restaurant’s success? Sending their staff to Asia on occasion to learn about the newest dining trends, and then incorporating them into the menu back home. This sprawling Daly City, California restaurant and event space opened in 1996 and has been one of the Bay Area’s top Chinese spots since day one. World-class dim sum is the name of the game during lunchtime, but once dinner rolls around Koi Palace becomes a seafood destination, with entire menu sections dedicated to abalone crab, shrimp, and lobster. While these preparations are spot-on authentic, there’s plenty of room to be daring: goose intestine chow fun, anyone? We’ll stick with the whole suckling pig, selling for $190, or their legendary Shanghai crab dumplings.


BEST General Tso’s Chicken

Perfectly crispy coated chicken is tossed in a deliciously sweet and spicy sauce and served with steamed rice. Ready in less than 30 minutes and better than the takeout version, for spicy food lovers General Tso’s Chicken is totally irresistible!

General Tso’s Chicken has been one of America’s most popular Chinese takeout dishes for decades. You’ll find it on practically every Chinese menu in every Chinese restaurant in the U.S.

Its origin goes back to the 1950’s in Taiwan where it was first created by a Hunan chef named Peng Chang-Kuei. He developed this dish in his restaurant and named it after a 19th Hunanese general. While the original dish of the 50’s shares some similarities to today’s version (bold, hot, spicy, heavy, salty), the version we know today that is sold as a popular takeout dish is largely a Chinese-American invention. And a delicious one at that!

Bite-sized pieces of tender chicken are dipped in a coating and fried until perfectly crispy, then tossed in a deliciously sweet and spicy sauce. Steamed broccoli is a popular accompaniment in many takeout places and of course a bed of fragrant steamed rice. For spicy food lovers, General Tso’s Chicken is practically irresistible!

So the next time you’re craving General Tso’s chicken, skip the takeout joint. Not only will this rival your favorite takeout version, it’ll be hot and ready in less than 30 minutes!

Combine the sauce ingredients in another bowl until the sugar and cornstarch are dissolved and set aside until later.

Place the chicken in a medium-sized mixing bowl. In a small bowl, whisk the marinade ingredients together and then pour over the cubed chicken. Stir to thoroughly coat and set aside.

Combine the coating ingredients in a medium-sized bowl.

Pick up the chicken pieces and shake off the excess marinade, then dredge the pieces in the cornstarch mixture, evenly coating the pieces and shaking off the excess.

Heat the oil in the deep fryer to 375 degrees F.

Working in batches, deep fry the chicken until the chicken is cooked through, golden brown and crispy, about 3-4 minutes.

Place the chicken on paper towels to drain.

Heat the tablespoon of oil in a wok or large heavy frying pan over medium-high heat. Fry the garlic, ginger and red chilies for about 30 seconds until fragrant. Add the sauce and simmer until thickened, a minute or two.

Add the fried chicken and stir to thoroughly coat. Simmer for a minute until the chicken has absorbed the sauce but is still crispy. Stir in the green onions.

Serve immediately with steamed rice and broccoli (traditional in many takeout places).


The best Chinese takeout in America

Pick up the phone book (or use Google) in any city and chances are you'll find a Chinese restaurant nearby. High on convenience and intense flavor, Chinese food is one of the country’s great adopted cuisines. But for many, replicating the flavors and cooking techniques can present a challenge — even to the more skilled gastronomes among us. Even if you know how to dry-fry and double-steam with the best of them, sometimes it’s nice to sit back and let someone else do the work while you catch up on Homeland or thumb through your weathered copy of 50 Shades of Grey.

From Sichuan and Cantonese to Shandong and Beijing, we’re a fortunate nation to have so many provincial Chinese cuisines represented not just in the larger metropolises but throughout the lower 48 and beyond. Whether you’re sampling San Tung’s addictive chicken wings on the run in San Francisco or skipping the horrendous lines at New York’s Mission Chinese Food outpost in favor of scenting your home with a mala-heavy mapo tofu perfume, the restaurants listed within are sure to work your tongue harder than a Foxconn employee.

The Daily Meal searched America to seek out the best Chinese takeout, from strip mall nooks and holes-in-the-wall to bustling Chinatown institutions and bold new kids on the block. We consulted our own group of chefs and city experts, James Beard Award-winning and nominated chefs like Ken Oringer and Anita Lo and both nationally and locally trusted sources online and in print in cities across the country. Some great places didn't make the list, but after qualifying the food based on authenticity to regional cuisine, speed and of course, flavor, the food from these 12 places emerged as the clear winners.

For those with a coastal bias — don’t despair. There’s many a specialized delicacy to be found wherever cowboys roam (which, if Cowboys and Aliens has taught us anything, is everywhere). Practice your chopsticks skills, it's time to get down to business.

Mission Chinese Food, New York City
Danny Bowien’s white-hot San Francisco transplant has garnered just as much press and adoration as the West Coast original, and both locations command hours-long waits that are only somewhat assuaged by kegs of free beer for those who decide to stick around. The key, then, is to order takeout so that you can enjoy quirky, nontraditional dishes like barbecued pig ear terrine and an upmarket twist on beef with broccoli that incorporates tender brisket and smoked oyster sauce without being crushed by hipsters.

Facing East, Bellevue, Washington
Handheld Taiwanese pork bao — featuring fatty porcine nuggets stuffed into tender buns — are well worth the trip to Facing East, but you’d be selling yourself short not to try the rest of the animal, available in dishes like pig diaphragm or a dumpling made with sweet potato flour and filled with porky goodness. For a fun race against time, try getting home before your order of shaved ice melts.

Beijing Pie House, Monterey Park, California
The golden, flaky Frisbee-sized meat pies called xian bing at Beijing Pie House are something to behold and be held. Splitting their tender crust reveals a paragon of flavorful fillings that eclipse the standard lamb or pork in favor of combinations like pork with summer squash, leek and egg, or shrimp with mushroom. Like a xiaolongbao on steroids, you’ll be happy to give these puppies a rest on the ride home lest you feel the wrath of scalding hot meat juices with each bite.

Katy’s Dumpling House, Chicago
Forgo the namesake dumplings. You have to hand it to "Katy," her handmade noodles are just about the best on offer in the Windy City. Tangled with ground pork in fiery dan dan noodles or sunken into deeply flavored beef broth, their springiness makes slurping a pleasure. However, one of Katy’s finest contributions is a dish that melds the restaurant’s signature item with Chicago’s European roots in a bowl of beef noodles with homemade sauerkraut.

Best China, Canton, Michigan
Shanghai specialties are the selling point here, best chosen from the Chinese menu available upon request. For your determination, you’ll be treated to mountains of preserved vegetables, tender Lion’s Head pork meatballs, and thick, springy fried noodles and rice cakes. For all the adventurousness, they still manage to make an excellent wonton soup.


Cooking with symbolism

“Food is what brings people around the table,” said Hsiao-Ching Chou, who teaches cooking classes in Seattle and is author of the cookbooks Chinese Soul Food and Vegetarian Chinese Soul Food.

“Because all the foods are imbued with symbolism for wealth, prosperity, long life, health and family, the feast becomes more exalted as part of the experience,” she said. Nian gao — a glutinous rice dessert — is very sticky, a characteristic that references families sticking together, for example.

Many other dishes also will contribute to the feast. Noodles symbolize longevity, so there is typically a noodle dish on the table. Dumplings, which are shaped like the ingot currency used in the Ming dynasty, symbolize wealth and prosperity. Fish, prepared whole, offers yearly abundance from beginning to end.

Dorothy Huang, author of Dorothy Huang’s Chinese Cooking and Chinese Cuisine Made Simple, says some people prepare eight dishes for the Lunar New Year because eight is a lucky number in the Chinese culture. The word “eight” in Mandarin is pronounced “ba,” which sounds very similar to “fa.” The expression “fa cai” means getting rich, says Huang. In fact, the Lunar New Year greeting of “Gong Xi Fa Cai” in Mandarin — or “Gong Hay Fat Choy” in Cantonese — translates to “Wishing you prosperity.”


Top 10 Most Popular Chinese Foods in United States

Chinese foods are delicious and cost-effective in United States, the below is the top 10 most popular Chinese foods in United States list with foods images. Check here if you are looking for Authentic Chinese food recipes.

1.Sweet and Sour Pork

You can order this in almost any Chinese restaurant and buffet, but in the United States the spareribs is boneless and pre-cooked.

2. Kung Pao Chicken

Kung Pao Chicken is a classic Sichuan cuisine, this food gets a lot of Chinese fans in Mainland China.
3. Spring Roll

Spring roll is an authentic Chinese food, this food is much more in USA than Mainland China, because there are so many buffets and take-out restaurants in United States.

4. Fried Rice with Egg

Fried rice with egg, shrimp or vegetables is my favorite fried rice, the tip for cooking good fried rice is add little sugar and soy sauce.

5. Ma Po Tofu

Ma Po Tofu is another Sichuan food, you could buy Ma Po Tofu sauce from Chinese supermarket, boiled Tofu first then cook the sauce and add boiled Tofu, follow those steps you can make delicious Ma Po Tofu.

6. Chinese Meat Dumpling

Dumpling is one of my favorite Chinese foods,especially shrimp and chive dumpling stuff, but it is too difficult to make for the beginner, but dumpling is very normal in United States, you can buy it from any Chinese restaurant.


Wonton is well known in United States because the Wonton Soup, this soup normally comes with fried rice or combo. Actually Wonton is usually eaten at breakfast.

8. Roast Duck

Roast Duck in United States is famous in Cantonese restaurant, it’s about $7 for half one, the Cantonese call Roast Duck as 烧腊.

9. Chow Mein

Chow Mein is a kind of fast food in mainland China, but in United States it gets much more popular and serve as lunch and dinner.

10. Fried Shrimps with Cashew Nuts

Ok, to be honest, this one is not my taste, but looks delicious the price is a little bit higher than others, because of the cashew nuts.


The Chinese Takeout Cookbook: Quick and Easy Dishes to Prepare at Home

America’s love affair with Chinese food dates back more than a century. Today, such dishes as General Tso’s Chicken, Sweet and Sour Pork, and Egg Rolls are as common as hamburgers and spaghetti. Probably at this moment, a drawer in your kitchen is stuffed with Chinese takeout menus, soy sauce packets, and wooden chopsticks, right?

But what if you didn’t have to eat your America’s love affair with Chinese food dates back more than a century. Today, such dishes as General Tso’s Chicken, Sweet and Sour Pork, and Egg Rolls are as common as hamburgers and spaghetti. Probably at this moment, a drawer in your kitchen is stuffed with Chinese takeout menus, soy sauce packets, and wooden chopsticks, right?

But what if you didn’t have to eat your favorites out of a container?

In The Chinese Takeout Cookbook, Chinese food blogger and cooking instructor Diana Kuan brings Chinatown to your home with this amazing collection of more than eighty popular Chinese takeout recipes—appetizers, main courses, noodle and rice dishes, and desserts—all easy-to-prepare and MSG-free. Plus you’ll discover how to

• stock your pantry with ingredients you can find at your local supermarket
• season and master a wok for all your Chinese cooking needs
• prepare the flavor trifecta of Chinese cuisine—ginger, garlic, and scallions
• wrap egg rolls, dumplings, and wontons like a pro
• steam fish to perfection every time
• create vegetarian variations that will please everyone’s palate
• whip up delectable sweet treats in time for the Chinese New Year

The Chinese Takeout Cookbookalso features mouthwatering color photos throughout as well as sidebars that highlight helpful notes, including how to freeze and recook dumplings cooking tidbits, such as how to kick up your dish with a bit of heat and the history behind some of your favorite comfort foods, including the curious New York invention of the pastrami egg roll and the influence of Tiki culture on Chinese cuisine. So, put down that takeout menu, grab the wok, and let’s get cooking!

Here for the first time—in one fun, easy, and tasty collection—are more than 80 favorite Chinese restaurant dishes to make right in your own kitchen:

• Cold Sesame Noodles
• Kung Pao Chicken
• Classic Barbecue Spareribs
• Beef Chow Fun
• Homemade Chili Oil
• Hot and Sour Soup
• Chinatown Roast Duck
• Moo Shu Pork
• Dry-Fried String Beans
• Black Sesame Ice Cream
• And of course, perfectly fried Pork and Shrimp Egg Rolls!

“Diana Kuan chronicles America’s love affair with Chinese food. The Chinese Takeout Cookbook is the perfect reason to throw out those menus cluttering your kitchen drawers!”—Patricia Tanumihardja, author of The Asian Grandmothers Cookbook


Recipe Instructions

To make the BBQ sauce, stir together the garlic, pineapple, ground star anise, salt, sugar, honey, peanut oil, hoisin sauce, ground bean sauce, tomato puree or paste, ketchup, five spice powder, orange juice, white pepper, and paprika.

In a zip-loc bag, add the ribs and half the sauce. Either marinate them overnight, or for 4-6 hours with a little extra sauce. Store the leftover sauce for later use.

Preheat your oven to 325 degrees. Prepare a roasting pan lined with heavy duty foil for easy clean-up.

Add about 2 cups of water to the pan so there is about a half inch of water. Place a roasting rack on top of the pan and place your spare ribs on the rack (rib side up) and place in your preheated oven.

Roast for 30 minutes. Flip the racks over and roast for another 45-60 minutes.

Add water to the roasting pan as the water dries up during the roasting process. If you like, you can finish them with a couple minutes under the broiler.

Serve these BBQ Chinese spare ribs right out of the oven after they have cooled enough to eat. They are at their best fresh out of the oven!

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Watch the video: Τα καλύτερα φαγητά στη Νέα Υόρκη. New York City Bites


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