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Cooking Tips We Learned From Our Parents

Cooking Tips We Learned From Our Parents


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Long before the writers and editors at The Daily Meal were reading cookbooks, watching Food Network and working for a food website, we learned how to cook from the earliest teachers in life: our parents. We’d sit on the counter as Mom rolled out cookies or sip orange juice while Dad made weekend brunch. These are the most useful tricks that The Daily Meal staff learned from Mom and Dad.

A cast-iron skillet makes everything better

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There’s a lot you can do with a cast-iron pan — as long as you use it properly. Our parents taught us that no pan gets a sear on your steak or adds flavor to fried chicken quite like a cast-iron skillet. Plus, as your skillet absorbs oil, the seasoning adds flavor to your pan, creates a natural non-sticking surface and also provides protection against rust.

Italian dressing is a quick and easy marinade

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If you’re not sure what to make for dinner on any given night, look no further than your pantry. A bottle of salad dressing, especially Italian dressing, makes a super simple and scrumptious marinade for a chicken breast.

Put cheese in the freezer before grating

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Whether you’re grating cheese for a wonderful, over-the-top mac and cheese recipe or simply to top a salad or pasta, it’s important to make sure you’re using the cheese grater properly. One method of making this easier is to put the cheese in the freezer for about 15 minutes or so prior to grating.

Toast old spices to revive them

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Using old spices that have lost their flavor is definitely a bad cooking habit, but you don’t need to throw those spices out entirely. Add the amount of spice you intend to use to a skillet that’s on medium flame, shaking the pan or stirring for one to three minutes until the spices start to give off a strong aroma again.

Save bones for stock

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Bones are one of those ingredients that no one cooks with anymore but should. If you save your vegetable scraps and carcasses from turkey, rib roast or whatever meat you had for dinner and simmer them all together, you’ll make a broth that’s better than anything you can buy at the grocery store.

Add more butter than a recipe calls for

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Whether they would use chicken fat, lard or pure butter, our parents taught us that you should read the amount of fat listed in a recipe as a suggestion — and then use way, way more to up your flavor. And though you may think fat is bad for you, there are a surprising number of reasons you should actually eat more fat.

Refrigerate your cookie dough before baking

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If you want your cookies to be pillowy soft but not flatten out as you bake them, refrigerate your dough and thoroughly chill it before you put it into the oven. This allows the fat to penetrate the cookie and gives the sweet ingredients like sugar and vanilla time to marinate and become more pronounced.

Use dental floss to cut doughy, sticky ingredients

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Cutting sticky foods like cinnamon roll dough or soft cheeses can be a hassle and super messy. But if you use unscented, unflavored dental floss, you can easily slice through a number of tricky ingredients with accuracy.

Use dowel rods when rolling out dough to keep it even

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Dowel rods are essential tools in the kitchen. When rolling out dough, place 1/8-inch-thick dowel rods on either side of the dough. Doing this will steady your rolling pin and result in an even thickness throughout your dough. This way, your end result will all bake at the same rate.

Water and plastic wrap will keep your guacamole fresh

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You’ve made the most delicious guacamole ever, but despite your best efforts, you can’t finish it all in one sitting. Mom gave us one hot tip: After spooning your leftover guac into a container, lightly press it flat with a spoon to eliminate any air pockets and pour a thin layer of water over the top. It sounds gross, but the water sits on top of the dip and creates a perfect air-tight barrier.

Just get takeout

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Mom and Dad knew when to call it quits. Whether you burned your roast chicken, forgot to pick up an integral ingredient at the grocery store or just had a really long day at work and are tired, you should know when to take care of yourself, relax and order takeout from your favorite pizzeria.

Sprinkle cinnamon on top of your drip coffee

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Even if you’re drinking the very best coffee in America, a black cup of java can still be bitter. If you don’t want to use an artificial sweetener or creamer for your coffee, sprinkle some cinnamon in your mug. The spice will help to cut some of the bitterness.

Use older eggs for boiling

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If you want to cook and peel hard-boiled eggs perfectly every time, don’t start with a dozen eggs you just bought at the grocery store. Older eggs will peel much more easily. Add the eggs to a pot of cold water, bring them to a boil, take them off the heat and stew for 13 minutes. Then you can make the most delicious deviled eggs with ease.

Add soy sauce to your eggs

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Revive old lettuce with water

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Did the spinach in your spring mix get all sad and droopy before you had the chance to put it into one of the best salads ever? If you want to bring that green back to life, fill a sink with cold water about 4 inches deep and add half a cup of white vinegar. Put your lettuce into the bath and it will crisp right back up.

Frozen produce is just as good as fresh

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Turn leftover pie dough into a new dessert

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When trying a classic pie recipe or a new creation entirely, save the trimmings. You can sprinkle cinnamon and sugar on that leftover dough and bake it quickly for an extra sweet treat.

Soften butter with a rolling pin

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If you’re baking cookies or a cake, chances are the recipe calls for a certain amount of butter, softened. If you didn’t have the foresight to set it out early enough, don’t pop it in the microwave. Instead, put your butter in a zip-lock bag and roll it out using a rolling pin. This trick willhelp even an amateur baker look like a pro.

Substitute eggs with applesauce or bananas

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Whether you’re looking to make a vegan-friendly dessert or you’re simply out of eggs, both bananas and applesauce can be used as a good alternative. The general rule is to use one mashed banana or 1/4 cup of applesauce per one egg called for in the recipe.

Let steaks rest after cooking

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In order to make the perfect steak, it’s important to allow your meat to “rest” after cooking it. Place the steak on a plate or cutting board, lightly covering it with some foil, and leave it for about five minutes or so. This allows the juices in the steak to settle and distribute evenly; if you cut into the steak too soon, you risk allowing it to dry out.

Freeze or refrigerate dough for a more flaky texture

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If you’re baking bread or a pastry that calls for a more flaky texture — such as scones, pie crust or a homemade childhood dessert like toaster pastries — leave your dough in the freezer for 20 to 30 minutes or in the fridge for an hour or two. It’s important to do this before rolling out the dough to get that nice flake when baking.

Add a small ball of dough when you’ve used too much salt

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It can be easy to make the mistake of adding too much salt when cooking, especially since there are so many ingredients that already have a surprising amount of sodium. If you’ve found yourself in this predicament, mix some flour with water to make a small ball of dough and place that in the pot along with your food. Let the ball sit in there for a few minutes before taking it out, and it should soak up some of that extra salt.

Soak onions in water

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One trick to chopping onions without crying is to do so in a bowl of cold water. This will also take some of that “bite” out of raw onions. Leave your cut onions in a chilled bowl of water for five to 15 minutes, and it will get rid of some of that pungent flavor.

Grow your own vegetables

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Save vegetable scraps for vegetable stock

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Just as bones should be saved for use in a chicken or beef stock, vegetable scraps can be used in making a vegetable stock instead of being thrown out. If you’re saving up those scraps for more than a couple days, make sure you know how to freeze them properly.


Pepper Teigen Shares Family Memories, Cooking Tips and a Favorite Recipe

“Everyone’s favorite Thai mom” dishes on her new cookbook, pantry essentials and the kitchen tools she can’t live without—plus shares a delicious recipe for coconut pancakes.

If you follow Chrissy Teigen&aposs website, social media accounts and cookbooks, you know what a big influence her mom, Vilailuck𠅊ka Pepper—is on all aspects of her life, especially her cooking. And now Pepper has her own cookbook, The Pepper Thai Cookbook: Family Recipes from Everyone&aposs Favorite Thai Mom, in which she shares favorite recipes and the stories behind them. She told EatingWell.com that Chrissy helped inspire her to put the recipes that she cooks from memory down in writing. 

Family is an important theme throughout the cookbook, which details dishes from Pepper&aposs childhood in Thailand and the meals she made when she first arrived in the United States—including her best attempts to recreate the flavors of home with the ingredients available in American supermarkets𠅊s well as favorite dishes of Chrissy, her husband, John Legend, and their children, Luna and Miles. Pepper says she learned so much from her own mom by cooking with her and being a "helping hand," a practice that she continued with her daughters and now with her grandchildren. 

"She didn&apost cook American food until she came here but she did her best to learn so she could make meals that her American family would love," Chrissy writes in the forward to the book. "After she fed us, she&aposd cook a separate Thai meal for herself, from scratch, using whatever Asian-ish ingredients she could find at our local grocery store in Utah, Washington, Idaho, Ohio or wherever we were living at the time. Mom&aposs food looked different and smelled different—honestly, I was a little embarrassed about it when I was young. But, all along, it was this hidden treasure that really ended up inspiring me to be the cook I am today. I can&apost imagine my life without having experienced the flavors, spices and comforting aromas of Mom&aposs cooking."

In the foreword, Chrissy calls out one of her favorite dishes of her mom&aposs: this recipe for Kanom Krok (Thai Coconut Pancakes), which Pepper is also sharing here with EatingWell.com. "They were the first thing I cooked with Chrissy," Pepper told EatingWell. "Luna loves making them now." She said that when she now makes the pancakes with Luna she is full of memories of making them with her own mother and grandmother. "In our family, kanom krok is a tradition that is passed down from mother to daughter," Pepper says in the recipe&aposs headnote. "My grandma taught my mom, and my mom taught me. Even before we were allowed to use the stove, my sisters and I would play in the dirt and pretend we were making little mud pie versions of kanom krok. When Chrissy and Tina were little, I taught them how to make the pancakes so they were just the right texture. They were really skilled at it, too! It was the perfect food for us to cook and eat together. When I was working on this book, Luna got to make her first kanom krok, ladling the batter in the hot pan and watching the edges bubble. She was a natural, so it must be in our genes." 

In addition to reminiscences about cooking with her family, Pepper shared some insightful tidbits about her own cooking that are well worth incorporating into your own kitchen repertoire:


Pepper Teigen Shares Family Memories, Cooking Tips and a Favorite Recipe

“Everyone’s favorite Thai mom” dishes on her new cookbook, pantry essentials and the kitchen tools she can’t live without—plus shares a delicious recipe for coconut pancakes.

If you follow Chrissy Teigen&aposs website, social media accounts and cookbooks, you know what a big influence her mom, Vilailuck𠅊ka Pepper—is on all aspects of her life, especially her cooking. And now Pepper has her own cookbook, The Pepper Thai Cookbook: Family Recipes from Everyone&aposs Favorite Thai Mom, in which she shares favorite recipes and the stories behind them. She told EatingWell.com that Chrissy helped inspire her to put the recipes that she cooks from memory down in writing. 

Family is an important theme throughout the cookbook, which details dishes from Pepper&aposs childhood in Thailand and the meals she made when she first arrived in the United States—including her best attempts to recreate the flavors of home with the ingredients available in American supermarkets𠅊s well as favorite dishes of Chrissy, her husband, John Legend, and their children, Luna and Miles. Pepper says she learned so much from her own mom by cooking with her and being a "helping hand," a practice that she continued with her daughters and now with her grandchildren. 

"She didn&apost cook American food until she came here but she did her best to learn so she could make meals that her American family would love," Chrissy writes in the forward to the book. "After she fed us, she&aposd cook a separate Thai meal for herself, from scratch, using whatever Asian-ish ingredients she could find at our local grocery store in Utah, Washington, Idaho, Ohio or wherever we were living at the time. Mom&aposs food looked different and smelled different—honestly, I was a little embarrassed about it when I was young. But, all along, it was this hidden treasure that really ended up inspiring me to be the cook I am today. I can&apost imagine my life without having experienced the flavors, spices and comforting aromas of Mom&aposs cooking."

In the foreword, Chrissy calls out one of her favorite dishes of her mom&aposs: this recipe for Kanom Krok (Thai Coconut Pancakes), which Pepper is also sharing here with EatingWell.com. "They were the first thing I cooked with Chrissy," Pepper told EatingWell. "Luna loves making them now." She said that when she now makes the pancakes with Luna she is full of memories of making them with her own mother and grandmother. "In our family, kanom krok is a tradition that is passed down from mother to daughter," Pepper says in the recipe&aposs headnote. "My grandma taught my mom, and my mom taught me. Even before we were allowed to use the stove, my sisters and I would play in the dirt and pretend we were making little mud pie versions of kanom krok. When Chrissy and Tina were little, I taught them how to make the pancakes so they were just the right texture. They were really skilled at it, too! It was the perfect food for us to cook and eat together. When I was working on this book, Luna got to make her first kanom krok, ladling the batter in the hot pan and watching the edges bubble. She was a natural, so it must be in our genes." 

In addition to reminiscences about cooking with her family, Pepper shared some insightful tidbits about her own cooking that are well worth incorporating into your own kitchen repertoire:


Pepper Teigen Shares Family Memories, Cooking Tips and a Favorite Recipe

“Everyone’s favorite Thai mom” dishes on her new cookbook, pantry essentials and the kitchen tools she can’t live without—plus shares a delicious recipe for coconut pancakes.

If you follow Chrissy Teigen&aposs website, social media accounts and cookbooks, you know what a big influence her mom, Vilailuck𠅊ka Pepper—is on all aspects of her life, especially her cooking. And now Pepper has her own cookbook, The Pepper Thai Cookbook: Family Recipes from Everyone&aposs Favorite Thai Mom, in which she shares favorite recipes and the stories behind them. She told EatingWell.com that Chrissy helped inspire her to put the recipes that she cooks from memory down in writing. 

Family is an important theme throughout the cookbook, which details dishes from Pepper&aposs childhood in Thailand and the meals she made when she first arrived in the United States—including her best attempts to recreate the flavors of home with the ingredients available in American supermarkets𠅊s well as favorite dishes of Chrissy, her husband, John Legend, and their children, Luna and Miles. Pepper says she learned so much from her own mom by cooking with her and being a "helping hand," a practice that she continued with her daughters and now with her grandchildren. 

"She didn&apost cook American food until she came here but she did her best to learn so she could make meals that her American family would love," Chrissy writes in the forward to the book. "After she fed us, she&aposd cook a separate Thai meal for herself, from scratch, using whatever Asian-ish ingredients she could find at our local grocery store in Utah, Washington, Idaho, Ohio or wherever we were living at the time. Mom&aposs food looked different and smelled different—honestly, I was a little embarrassed about it when I was young. But, all along, it was this hidden treasure that really ended up inspiring me to be the cook I am today. I can&apost imagine my life without having experienced the flavors, spices and comforting aromas of Mom&aposs cooking."

In the foreword, Chrissy calls out one of her favorite dishes of her mom&aposs: this recipe for Kanom Krok (Thai Coconut Pancakes), which Pepper is also sharing here with EatingWell.com. "They were the first thing I cooked with Chrissy," Pepper told EatingWell. "Luna loves making them now." She said that when she now makes the pancakes with Luna she is full of memories of making them with her own mother and grandmother. "In our family, kanom krok is a tradition that is passed down from mother to daughter," Pepper says in the recipe&aposs headnote. "My grandma taught my mom, and my mom taught me. Even before we were allowed to use the stove, my sisters and I would play in the dirt and pretend we were making little mud pie versions of kanom krok. When Chrissy and Tina were little, I taught them how to make the pancakes so they were just the right texture. They were really skilled at it, too! It was the perfect food for us to cook and eat together. When I was working on this book, Luna got to make her first kanom krok, ladling the batter in the hot pan and watching the edges bubble. She was a natural, so it must be in our genes." 

In addition to reminiscences about cooking with her family, Pepper shared some insightful tidbits about her own cooking that are well worth incorporating into your own kitchen repertoire:


Pepper Teigen Shares Family Memories, Cooking Tips and a Favorite Recipe

“Everyone’s favorite Thai mom” dishes on her new cookbook, pantry essentials and the kitchen tools she can’t live without—plus shares a delicious recipe for coconut pancakes.

If you follow Chrissy Teigen&aposs website, social media accounts and cookbooks, you know what a big influence her mom, Vilailuck𠅊ka Pepper—is on all aspects of her life, especially her cooking. And now Pepper has her own cookbook, The Pepper Thai Cookbook: Family Recipes from Everyone&aposs Favorite Thai Mom, in which she shares favorite recipes and the stories behind them. She told EatingWell.com that Chrissy helped inspire her to put the recipes that she cooks from memory down in writing. 

Family is an important theme throughout the cookbook, which details dishes from Pepper&aposs childhood in Thailand and the meals she made when she first arrived in the United States—including her best attempts to recreate the flavors of home with the ingredients available in American supermarkets𠅊s well as favorite dishes of Chrissy, her husband, John Legend, and their children, Luna and Miles. Pepper says she learned so much from her own mom by cooking with her and being a "helping hand," a practice that she continued with her daughters and now with her grandchildren. 

"She didn&apost cook American food until she came here but she did her best to learn so she could make meals that her American family would love," Chrissy writes in the forward to the book. "After she fed us, she&aposd cook a separate Thai meal for herself, from scratch, using whatever Asian-ish ingredients she could find at our local grocery store in Utah, Washington, Idaho, Ohio or wherever we were living at the time. Mom&aposs food looked different and smelled different—honestly, I was a little embarrassed about it when I was young. But, all along, it was this hidden treasure that really ended up inspiring me to be the cook I am today. I can&apost imagine my life without having experienced the flavors, spices and comforting aromas of Mom&aposs cooking."

In the foreword, Chrissy calls out one of her favorite dishes of her mom&aposs: this recipe for Kanom Krok (Thai Coconut Pancakes), which Pepper is also sharing here with EatingWell.com. "They were the first thing I cooked with Chrissy," Pepper told EatingWell. "Luna loves making them now." She said that when she now makes the pancakes with Luna she is full of memories of making them with her own mother and grandmother. "In our family, kanom krok is a tradition that is passed down from mother to daughter," Pepper says in the recipe&aposs headnote. "My grandma taught my mom, and my mom taught me. Even before we were allowed to use the stove, my sisters and I would play in the dirt and pretend we were making little mud pie versions of kanom krok. When Chrissy and Tina were little, I taught them how to make the pancakes so they were just the right texture. They were really skilled at it, too! It was the perfect food for us to cook and eat together. When I was working on this book, Luna got to make her first kanom krok, ladling the batter in the hot pan and watching the edges bubble. She was a natural, so it must be in our genes." 

In addition to reminiscences about cooking with her family, Pepper shared some insightful tidbits about her own cooking that are well worth incorporating into your own kitchen repertoire:


Pepper Teigen Shares Family Memories, Cooking Tips and a Favorite Recipe

“Everyone’s favorite Thai mom” dishes on her new cookbook, pantry essentials and the kitchen tools she can’t live without—plus shares a delicious recipe for coconut pancakes.

If you follow Chrissy Teigen&aposs website, social media accounts and cookbooks, you know what a big influence her mom, Vilailuck𠅊ka Pepper—is on all aspects of her life, especially her cooking. And now Pepper has her own cookbook, The Pepper Thai Cookbook: Family Recipes from Everyone&aposs Favorite Thai Mom, in which she shares favorite recipes and the stories behind them. She told EatingWell.com that Chrissy helped inspire her to put the recipes that she cooks from memory down in writing. 

Family is an important theme throughout the cookbook, which details dishes from Pepper&aposs childhood in Thailand and the meals she made when she first arrived in the United States—including her best attempts to recreate the flavors of home with the ingredients available in American supermarkets𠅊s well as favorite dishes of Chrissy, her husband, John Legend, and their children, Luna and Miles. Pepper says she learned so much from her own mom by cooking with her and being a "helping hand," a practice that she continued with her daughters and now with her grandchildren. 

"She didn&apost cook American food until she came here but she did her best to learn so she could make meals that her American family would love," Chrissy writes in the forward to the book. "After she fed us, she&aposd cook a separate Thai meal for herself, from scratch, using whatever Asian-ish ingredients she could find at our local grocery store in Utah, Washington, Idaho, Ohio or wherever we were living at the time. Mom&aposs food looked different and smelled different—honestly, I was a little embarrassed about it when I was young. But, all along, it was this hidden treasure that really ended up inspiring me to be the cook I am today. I can&apost imagine my life without having experienced the flavors, spices and comforting aromas of Mom&aposs cooking."

In the foreword, Chrissy calls out one of her favorite dishes of her mom&aposs: this recipe for Kanom Krok (Thai Coconut Pancakes), which Pepper is also sharing here with EatingWell.com. "They were the first thing I cooked with Chrissy," Pepper told EatingWell. "Luna loves making them now." She said that when she now makes the pancakes with Luna she is full of memories of making them with her own mother and grandmother. "In our family, kanom krok is a tradition that is passed down from mother to daughter," Pepper says in the recipe&aposs headnote. "My grandma taught my mom, and my mom taught me. Even before we were allowed to use the stove, my sisters and I would play in the dirt and pretend we were making little mud pie versions of kanom krok. When Chrissy and Tina were little, I taught them how to make the pancakes so they were just the right texture. They were really skilled at it, too! It was the perfect food for us to cook and eat together. When I was working on this book, Luna got to make her first kanom krok, ladling the batter in the hot pan and watching the edges bubble. She was a natural, so it must be in our genes." 

In addition to reminiscences about cooking with her family, Pepper shared some insightful tidbits about her own cooking that are well worth incorporating into your own kitchen repertoire:


Pepper Teigen Shares Family Memories, Cooking Tips and a Favorite Recipe

“Everyone’s favorite Thai mom” dishes on her new cookbook, pantry essentials and the kitchen tools she can’t live without—plus shares a delicious recipe for coconut pancakes.

If you follow Chrissy Teigen&aposs website, social media accounts and cookbooks, you know what a big influence her mom, Vilailuck𠅊ka Pepper—is on all aspects of her life, especially her cooking. And now Pepper has her own cookbook, The Pepper Thai Cookbook: Family Recipes from Everyone&aposs Favorite Thai Mom, in which she shares favorite recipes and the stories behind them. She told EatingWell.com that Chrissy helped inspire her to put the recipes that she cooks from memory down in writing. 

Family is an important theme throughout the cookbook, which details dishes from Pepper&aposs childhood in Thailand and the meals she made when she first arrived in the United States—including her best attempts to recreate the flavors of home with the ingredients available in American supermarkets𠅊s well as favorite dishes of Chrissy, her husband, John Legend, and their children, Luna and Miles. Pepper says she learned so much from her own mom by cooking with her and being a "helping hand," a practice that she continued with her daughters and now with her grandchildren. 

"She didn&apost cook American food until she came here but she did her best to learn so she could make meals that her American family would love," Chrissy writes in the forward to the book. "After she fed us, she&aposd cook a separate Thai meal for herself, from scratch, using whatever Asian-ish ingredients she could find at our local grocery store in Utah, Washington, Idaho, Ohio or wherever we were living at the time. Mom&aposs food looked different and smelled different—honestly, I was a little embarrassed about it when I was young. But, all along, it was this hidden treasure that really ended up inspiring me to be the cook I am today. I can&apost imagine my life without having experienced the flavors, spices and comforting aromas of Mom&aposs cooking."

In the foreword, Chrissy calls out one of her favorite dishes of her mom&aposs: this recipe for Kanom Krok (Thai Coconut Pancakes), which Pepper is also sharing here with EatingWell.com. "They were the first thing I cooked with Chrissy," Pepper told EatingWell. "Luna loves making them now." She said that when she now makes the pancakes with Luna she is full of memories of making them with her own mother and grandmother. "In our family, kanom krok is a tradition that is passed down from mother to daughter," Pepper says in the recipe&aposs headnote. "My grandma taught my mom, and my mom taught me. Even before we were allowed to use the stove, my sisters and I would play in the dirt and pretend we were making little mud pie versions of kanom krok. When Chrissy and Tina were little, I taught them how to make the pancakes so they were just the right texture. They were really skilled at it, too! It was the perfect food for us to cook and eat together. When I was working on this book, Luna got to make her first kanom krok, ladling the batter in the hot pan and watching the edges bubble. She was a natural, so it must be in our genes." 

In addition to reminiscences about cooking with her family, Pepper shared some insightful tidbits about her own cooking that are well worth incorporating into your own kitchen repertoire:


Pepper Teigen Shares Family Memories, Cooking Tips and a Favorite Recipe

“Everyone’s favorite Thai mom” dishes on her new cookbook, pantry essentials and the kitchen tools she can’t live without—plus shares a delicious recipe for coconut pancakes.

If you follow Chrissy Teigen&aposs website, social media accounts and cookbooks, you know what a big influence her mom, Vilailuck𠅊ka Pepper—is on all aspects of her life, especially her cooking. And now Pepper has her own cookbook, The Pepper Thai Cookbook: Family Recipes from Everyone&aposs Favorite Thai Mom, in which she shares favorite recipes and the stories behind them. She told EatingWell.com that Chrissy helped inspire her to put the recipes that she cooks from memory down in writing. 

Family is an important theme throughout the cookbook, which details dishes from Pepper&aposs childhood in Thailand and the meals she made when she first arrived in the United States—including her best attempts to recreate the flavors of home with the ingredients available in American supermarkets𠅊s well as favorite dishes of Chrissy, her husband, John Legend, and their children, Luna and Miles. Pepper says she learned so much from her own mom by cooking with her and being a "helping hand," a practice that she continued with her daughters and now with her grandchildren. 

"She didn&apost cook American food until she came here but she did her best to learn so she could make meals that her American family would love," Chrissy writes in the forward to the book. "After she fed us, she&aposd cook a separate Thai meal for herself, from scratch, using whatever Asian-ish ingredients she could find at our local grocery store in Utah, Washington, Idaho, Ohio or wherever we were living at the time. Mom&aposs food looked different and smelled different—honestly, I was a little embarrassed about it when I was young. But, all along, it was this hidden treasure that really ended up inspiring me to be the cook I am today. I can&apost imagine my life without having experienced the flavors, spices and comforting aromas of Mom&aposs cooking."

In the foreword, Chrissy calls out one of her favorite dishes of her mom&aposs: this recipe for Kanom Krok (Thai Coconut Pancakes), which Pepper is also sharing here with EatingWell.com. "They were the first thing I cooked with Chrissy," Pepper told EatingWell. "Luna loves making them now." She said that when she now makes the pancakes with Luna she is full of memories of making them with her own mother and grandmother. "In our family, kanom krok is a tradition that is passed down from mother to daughter," Pepper says in the recipe&aposs headnote. "My grandma taught my mom, and my mom taught me. Even before we were allowed to use the stove, my sisters and I would play in the dirt and pretend we were making little mud pie versions of kanom krok. When Chrissy and Tina were little, I taught them how to make the pancakes so they were just the right texture. They were really skilled at it, too! It was the perfect food for us to cook and eat together. When I was working on this book, Luna got to make her first kanom krok, ladling the batter in the hot pan and watching the edges bubble. She was a natural, so it must be in our genes." 

In addition to reminiscences about cooking with her family, Pepper shared some insightful tidbits about her own cooking that are well worth incorporating into your own kitchen repertoire:


Pepper Teigen Shares Family Memories, Cooking Tips and a Favorite Recipe

“Everyone’s favorite Thai mom” dishes on her new cookbook, pantry essentials and the kitchen tools she can’t live without—plus shares a delicious recipe for coconut pancakes.

If you follow Chrissy Teigen&aposs website, social media accounts and cookbooks, you know what a big influence her mom, Vilailuck𠅊ka Pepper—is on all aspects of her life, especially her cooking. And now Pepper has her own cookbook, The Pepper Thai Cookbook: Family Recipes from Everyone&aposs Favorite Thai Mom, in which she shares favorite recipes and the stories behind them. She told EatingWell.com that Chrissy helped inspire her to put the recipes that she cooks from memory down in writing. 

Family is an important theme throughout the cookbook, which details dishes from Pepper&aposs childhood in Thailand and the meals she made when she first arrived in the United States—including her best attempts to recreate the flavors of home with the ingredients available in American supermarkets𠅊s well as favorite dishes of Chrissy, her husband, John Legend, and their children, Luna and Miles. Pepper says she learned so much from her own mom by cooking with her and being a "helping hand," a practice that she continued with her daughters and now with her grandchildren. 

"She didn&apost cook American food until she came here but she did her best to learn so she could make meals that her American family would love," Chrissy writes in the forward to the book. "After she fed us, she&aposd cook a separate Thai meal for herself, from scratch, using whatever Asian-ish ingredients she could find at our local grocery store in Utah, Washington, Idaho, Ohio or wherever we were living at the time. Mom&aposs food looked different and smelled different—honestly, I was a little embarrassed about it when I was young. But, all along, it was this hidden treasure that really ended up inspiring me to be the cook I am today. I can&apost imagine my life without having experienced the flavors, spices and comforting aromas of Mom&aposs cooking."

In the foreword, Chrissy calls out one of her favorite dishes of her mom&aposs: this recipe for Kanom Krok (Thai Coconut Pancakes), which Pepper is also sharing here with EatingWell.com. "They were the first thing I cooked with Chrissy," Pepper told EatingWell. "Luna loves making them now." She said that when she now makes the pancakes with Luna she is full of memories of making them with her own mother and grandmother. "In our family, kanom krok is a tradition that is passed down from mother to daughter," Pepper says in the recipe&aposs headnote. "My grandma taught my mom, and my mom taught me. Even before we were allowed to use the stove, my sisters and I would play in the dirt and pretend we were making little mud pie versions of kanom krok. When Chrissy and Tina were little, I taught them how to make the pancakes so they were just the right texture. They were really skilled at it, too! It was the perfect food for us to cook and eat together. When I was working on this book, Luna got to make her first kanom krok, ladling the batter in the hot pan and watching the edges bubble. She was a natural, so it must be in our genes." 

In addition to reminiscences about cooking with her family, Pepper shared some insightful tidbits about her own cooking that are well worth incorporating into your own kitchen repertoire:


Pepper Teigen Shares Family Memories, Cooking Tips and a Favorite Recipe

“Everyone’s favorite Thai mom” dishes on her new cookbook, pantry essentials and the kitchen tools she can’t live without—plus shares a delicious recipe for coconut pancakes.

If you follow Chrissy Teigen&aposs website, social media accounts and cookbooks, you know what a big influence her mom, Vilailuck𠅊ka Pepper—is on all aspects of her life, especially her cooking. And now Pepper has her own cookbook, The Pepper Thai Cookbook: Family Recipes from Everyone&aposs Favorite Thai Mom, in which she shares favorite recipes and the stories behind them. She told EatingWell.com that Chrissy helped inspire her to put the recipes that she cooks from memory down in writing. 

Family is an important theme throughout the cookbook, which details dishes from Pepper&aposs childhood in Thailand and the meals she made when she first arrived in the United States—including her best attempts to recreate the flavors of home with the ingredients available in American supermarkets𠅊s well as favorite dishes of Chrissy, her husband, John Legend, and their children, Luna and Miles. Pepper says she learned so much from her own mom by cooking with her and being a "helping hand," a practice that she continued with her daughters and now with her grandchildren. 

"She didn&apost cook American food until she came here but she did her best to learn so she could make meals that her American family would love," Chrissy writes in the forward to the book. "After she fed us, she&aposd cook a separate Thai meal for herself, from scratch, using whatever Asian-ish ingredients she could find at our local grocery store in Utah, Washington, Idaho, Ohio or wherever we were living at the time. Mom&aposs food looked different and smelled different—honestly, I was a little embarrassed about it when I was young. But, all along, it was this hidden treasure that really ended up inspiring me to be the cook I am today. I can&apost imagine my life without having experienced the flavors, spices and comforting aromas of Mom&aposs cooking."

In the foreword, Chrissy calls out one of her favorite dishes of her mom&aposs: this recipe for Kanom Krok (Thai Coconut Pancakes), which Pepper is also sharing here with EatingWell.com. "They were the first thing I cooked with Chrissy," Pepper told EatingWell. "Luna loves making them now." She said that when she now makes the pancakes with Luna she is full of memories of making them with her own mother and grandmother. "In our family, kanom krok is a tradition that is passed down from mother to daughter," Pepper says in the recipe&aposs headnote. "My grandma taught my mom, and my mom taught me. Even before we were allowed to use the stove, my sisters and I would play in the dirt and pretend we were making little mud pie versions of kanom krok. When Chrissy and Tina were little, I taught them how to make the pancakes so they were just the right texture. They were really skilled at it, too! It was the perfect food for us to cook and eat together. When I was working on this book, Luna got to make her first kanom krok, ladling the batter in the hot pan and watching the edges bubble. She was a natural, so it must be in our genes." 

In addition to reminiscences about cooking with her family, Pepper shared some insightful tidbits about her own cooking that are well worth incorporating into your own kitchen repertoire:


Pepper Teigen Shares Family Memories, Cooking Tips and a Favorite Recipe

“Everyone’s favorite Thai mom” dishes on her new cookbook, pantry essentials and the kitchen tools she can’t live without—plus shares a delicious recipe for coconut pancakes.

If you follow Chrissy Teigen&aposs website, social media accounts and cookbooks, you know what a big influence her mom, Vilailuck𠅊ka Pepper—is on all aspects of her life, especially her cooking. And now Pepper has her own cookbook, The Pepper Thai Cookbook: Family Recipes from Everyone&aposs Favorite Thai Mom, in which she shares favorite recipes and the stories behind them. She told EatingWell.com that Chrissy helped inspire her to put the recipes that she cooks from memory down in writing. 

Family is an important theme throughout the cookbook, which details dishes from Pepper&aposs childhood in Thailand and the meals she made when she first arrived in the United States—including her best attempts to recreate the flavors of home with the ingredients available in American supermarkets𠅊s well as favorite dishes of Chrissy, her husband, John Legend, and their children, Luna and Miles. Pepper says she learned so much from her own mom by cooking with her and being a "helping hand," a practice that she continued with her daughters and now with her grandchildren. 

"She didn&apost cook American food until she came here but she did her best to learn so she could make meals that her American family would love," Chrissy writes in the forward to the book. "After she fed us, she&aposd cook a separate Thai meal for herself, from scratch, using whatever Asian-ish ingredients she could find at our local grocery store in Utah, Washington, Idaho, Ohio or wherever we were living at the time. Mom&aposs food looked different and smelled different—honestly, I was a little embarrassed about it when I was young. But, all along, it was this hidden treasure that really ended up inspiring me to be the cook I am today. I can&apost imagine my life without having experienced the flavors, spices and comforting aromas of Mom&aposs cooking."

In the foreword, Chrissy calls out one of her favorite dishes of her mom&aposs: this recipe for Kanom Krok (Thai Coconut Pancakes), which Pepper is also sharing here with EatingWell.com. "They were the first thing I cooked with Chrissy," Pepper told EatingWell. "Luna loves making them now." She said that when she now makes the pancakes with Luna she is full of memories of making them with her own mother and grandmother. "In our family, kanom krok is a tradition that is passed down from mother to daughter," Pepper says in the recipe&aposs headnote. "My grandma taught my mom, and my mom taught me. Even before we were allowed to use the stove, my sisters and I would play in the dirt and pretend we were making little mud pie versions of kanom krok. When Chrissy and Tina were little, I taught them how to make the pancakes so they were just the right texture. They were really skilled at it, too! It was the perfect food for us to cook and eat together. When I was working on this book, Luna got to make her first kanom krok, ladling the batter in the hot pan and watching the edges bubble. She was a natural, so it must be in our genes." 

In addition to reminiscences about cooking with her family, Pepper shared some insightful tidbits about her own cooking that are well worth incorporating into your own kitchen repertoire:



Comments:

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